Dumping in Dixie: Race, Class, and Environmental Quality

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Westview Press, Mar 31, 2008 - Social Science - 257 pages
2 Reviews
To be poor, working-class, or a person of color in the United States often means bearing a disproportionate share of the countryOCOs environmental problems. Starting with the premise that all Americans have a basic right to live in a healthy environment, "Dumping in Dixie" chronicles the efforts of five African American communities, empowered by the civil rights movement, to link environmentalism with issues of social justice. In the third edition, Bullard speaks to us from the front lines of the environmental justice movement about new developments in environmental racism, different organizing strategies, and success stories in the struggle for environmental equity."
 

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I am the Author, The American State Litter Scorecard.
My Masters Thesis, DO MESS WITH IT, used material found in Bullard's book.
One will learn real world facts about the lackluster climate to
prosecute serious environmental crimes in the United States up to the early 1990's, and why non-white minorities--especially those living in the Deep South--have historically failed to embrace the GREEN ecology movement that really begun with Earth Day1970 and creation of the EPA. Interestingly, large communities with substantial African-American populations--New Orleans, Memphis, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Atlanta, Miami--lead by seemingly "anti-Green" Democrats "of color", continue to have severe ecological problems and are appearing each year on TRAVEL+LEISURE's "America's Dirtiest Cities" list.  

Review: Dumping in Dixie: Race, Class, and Environmental Quality

User Review  - Bob - Goodreads

shows how racism and hazardous waste go hand in hand. Read full review

Contents

Environmentalism and Social Justice
2
Race Versus Class in Spatial Location
6
The Theoretical Basis of Environmental Conflict
10
Translating Concern into Action
12
Environmentalism and Civil Rights
15
A Note on the Research Approach
18
Race Class and the Politics of Place
22
Consequences of Uneven Development
24
Unequal Protection
100
Environmental Apartheid
103
Louisiana as Paradise Lost
104
From American Dream to Nightmare
111
Environmental Justice as a Working Model
114
Impetus for Changing the System
117
Executive Order 12898
118
Remedying Past Inequities
120

Endangered Environs
27
Growing Black Militancy
30
Waste Facility Siting Disparities
33
Dispute Resolution and Toxics Case Studies
38
Houstons Northwood Manor Neighborhood
41
West Dallas Texas
46
Institute West Virginia
52
Alsen Louisiana
56
EmelleSumter County Alabama
60
Summary of Disputes and Resolutions
64
Survey Results
76
Rating of Environmental Problems
77
Siting Conflict and the Question of Equity
82
Economic Versus Environmental Tradeoffs
85
Environmental Activism
90
Environmental Racism Revisited
98
A Model Environmental Justice Framework
122
Winning at the Grass Roots
126
Relocation from Mount Dioxin
130
Citizens Against Nuclear Trash Chalk Up Major Victory
131
The Case of Shintech
133
Conclusion
136
Action Strategies for the TwentyFirst Century
138
Mobilizing the Grass Roots
144
Toward the Politics of Inclusion
146
Conclusion
159
NOTES
162
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
182
RESOURCES AND CONTACTS
198
INDEX
226
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 137 - EPA defines environmental justice as the "fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, color, national origin, or income with respect to the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations and policies.
Page 99 - There is a racial divide in the way the US government cleans up toxic waste sites and punishes polluters. White communities see faster action, better results and stiffer penalties than communities where blacks, Hispanics and other minorities live. This unequal protection often occurs whether the community is wealthy or poor.
Page 113 - First National People of Color Environmental Leadership Summit was held in Washington, DC The...
Page 97 - Racism" refers to any policy, practice, or directive that differentially affects or disadvantages (whether intended or unintended) individuals, groups, or communities based on race or color.
Page 45 - Dallas neighborhood) . The smelter pumped more than 269 tons of lead particles each year into the West Dallas air. Lead particles were blown by prevailing winds through the doors and windows of nearby residents, and onto the West Dallas streets, ball parks, and children playgrounds.
Page 99 - containment," the capping or walling off of a hazardous waste dump site, 7 percent more frequently than the cleanup method preferred under the law, permanent "treatment," to eliminate the waste or rid it of its toxins.
Page 188 - Prevalence of Asthma and Health Service Utilization of Asthmatic Children in an Inner City.
Page 191 - Predictors of asthma and persistent wheeze in a national sample of children in the United States.
Page 101 - States, found race to be the single most important factor (ie, more important than income, home ownership rate, and property values) in the location of abandoned toxic waste sites.

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About the author (2008)

Robert D. Bullard is a sociologist and long-time civil rights and environmental justice activist. He is professor of sociology at Clark Atlanta University, and also serves as director of the university’s Environmental Justice Resource Center.

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