Harvard Law Review, Volume 4

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Harvard Law Review Pub. Association, 1891 - Electronic journals
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The Harvard Law Review is a student-run journal of legal scholarship. It is intended to be an effective research tool for practicing lawyers and students of the law. The Review publishes articles by professors, judges, and practitioners and solicits reviews of important recent books from recognized experts.
 

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Page 98 - alternatives ("accept part of the goods so sold and actually receive the same, or give something in earnest to bind the bargain, or in part of payment"), with the things named in our old books as the badges of a completed transaction of sale (Glanvil, Book x. ch. 14; Bracton, 61
Page 227 - enacted in the exercise of its police powers, to the same extent and in the same manner as though such liquors or liquids had been produced in such State or Territory, and shall not be exempt therefrom by reason of being introduced in original package; or otherwise." States at the time the act was passed
Page 390 - absolute rights of individuals, to wit: the right of personal security, the right of personal liberty, and the right of private property. . . . The Declaration of Independence lays the foundation of our national existence upon the broad proposition " That all men are created equal; that
Page 227 - all, on arrival in such State or Territory.be subject to the operation and effect of the laws of such State or Territory, enacted in the exercise of its police powers, to the same extent and in the same manner as though such liquors or liquids had been produced in such State or Territory, and shall not be exempt therefrom by reason of being introduced
Page 331 - it on under a given name, that some other person should assume the same name, or the same name with a slight alteration, in such a way as to induce persons to deal with him in the belief that they are dealing with the person who has given a reputation to the name.
Page 199 - J., in Millar v. Taylor, 4 Burr. 2303, 2312. THAT the individual shall have full protection in person and in property is a principle as old as the common law ; but it has been found necessary from time to time to define anew the exact nature and extent of such protection. Political, social,
Page 324 - put forward this proposition: — The sound and true rule is that if the contract when made was valid by the laws of the State as then expounded by all departments of the government, and administered in its courts of justice, its validity
Page 40 - Due process of law means a course of legal proceedings according to those rules and principles which have been established in our systems of jurisprudence for the protection and enforcement of private rights.
Page 332 - it is a fraud on a person who had established a trade, and carried it on under a given name, that some other person should assume the same name ... in such a way as to induce persons to deal with him in the belief that they are dealing with

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