A History of Greece: The Greek revolution, pt. 2: Establishment of the Greek kingdom

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Clarendon Press, 1877 - Byzantine Empire
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Page 239 - The sovereign of Greece and the Greek state shall be bound to appropriate to the payment of the interest and sinking fund of such instalments of the loan as may have been raised under the guarantee of the...
Page 113 - We are therefore to look upon all the vast apparatus of our government, as having ultimately no other object or purpose but the distribution of justice, or in other words, the support of the Twelve Judges. Kings and parliaments, fleets and armies, officers of the court and revenue, ambassadors, ministers and privy councillors, are all subordinate in their end to this part of administration. Even the clergy, as their duty leads them to inculcate morality, may justly be thought, so far as regards this...
Page 239 - Courts, the first revenues of the state, in such manner that the actual receipts of the Greek treasury shall be devoted, first of all, to the payment of the said interest and sinking fund, and shall not be employed for any other purpose, until those payments on account of the instalments of the loan raised under the guarantee of the three Courts shall have been completely secured for the current year.
Page 352 - Trinity," swear according to the formula of their own religion. Art. 65. The House of Representatives determines by its regulations the manner of fulfilling its duties. Art. 66. The House of Representatives is composed of representatives chosen by the citizens having the right to elect by direct, universal, and secret suffrage. The parliamentary elections are ordered and carried out simultaneously throughout the realm.
Page 347 - Everyone may publish his opinions by speech, by writing, or by printing, observing the laws of the realm. The press is free. Censorship and every other preventive measure is prohibited. The seizure of newspapers and other printed treatises, whether before or after publication, is likewise prohibited. Exceptionally seizure after publication is permitted on account of insult to the Christian religion or to the person of the King, or, in cases determined by law, on account of...
Page 152 - The consequence was, that fear of the attacks of disbanded soldiers and avowed brigands drove most wealthy landlords into the nearest towns, and ,many abandoned the agricultural improvements they had commenced. In Maina the orders of the regency were openly opposed. Every possessor of a tower, indeed, declared that he had no objections to its destruction, but he invited the government to destroy every tower in Maina at the same time, otherwise no man's life and property would be secure. Some chiefs...
Page 337 - ... said town, to be applied to the payment of the interest and the extinction of the principal of the debt recently contracted by said corporation in filling its quota under the several drafts for troops made during the present war. SEC. 2. And be it further enacted, That the said corporation are hereby...
Page 146 - History, 402. [Bk.V.Ch.IV. an end, as if by enchantment, to the most frightful anarchy that ever desolated any Christian country in modern times. Many wise laws were enacted, and some useful measures were carried into execution promptly and thoroughly. The errors committed were probably fewer, and the good results produced much greater, than could have been obtained by any cabinet composed solely of Greeks.
Page 51 - The measures then recommended were embodied in a protocol signed at London on the 22nd March 1829, and were not very dissimilar from those which were ultimately adopted when Greece was declared a kingdom in 1832 2. The frontier of the Greek state was drawn from the Gulf of Volo to the Gulf of Arta. The annual tribute to the sultan was fixed at about 30,000. The Turks who had possessed land in Greece were allowed to sell their property. An hereditary sovereign was to be chosen by the three protecting...
Page 179 - AD18 43 .] dependence on the king, the ministers of the day, and the prefects of the hour. The demarch was not directly elected by the people, and the minister of the crown exercised a direct control over the budget of the demarchy. Yet the people, though not allowed to elect their own local chief, were nevertheless entrusted with the election of deputies to the lower legislative chamber. And this introduction of universal suffrage in the institutions of Greece was completely exceptional, for a property...

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