Report on the Administration of the Madras Presidency During the Year 1875-76

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Page 161 - ... lunatic asylums, choultries, markets, tanks and wells ; the payment of all charges connected with the objects for which such buildings have been constructed; the training and employment of vaccinators and medical practitioners ; the sanitary inspection of towns and villages; the cleansing of the roads, streets and tanks; and any other local works of public utility calculated to promote the health, comfort, and convenience of the people.
Page 80 - Act ; or (b) affecting the public debt of India, or the customs duties, or any other tax or duty for the time being in force and imposed by the authority of the Governor-General in Council for the general purposes of the Government of India...
Page 451 - For a person of average height, it is equal to about the distance from the elbow to the tip of the middle finger, plus a hand's-breadth, the former distance being the natural cubit (for a person of such height).
Page 123 - Judges with the jurisdiction of a Judge of a Court of Small Causes for the...
Page 97 - Court subject to its superintendence, and may, at its discretion, try any such persons brought before it on charges preferred by the Advocate- General, or by any Magistrate, or by any other officer specially empowered by Government in that behalf.
Page 232 - ... effected naturally, no works being required for that purpose beyond small open trenches in the rice fields. Ordinary agricultural works in the Madras Presidency irrigate an area of about 3,865,157 acres, yielding a revenue of approximately Rs. 1,31,04,126. They consist of two kinds, viz. (1) rain - fed tanks or reservoirs, generally of minor individual importance, each deriving its supply directly from rainfall distributed over an area of land, which is called the catchment basin ; and (2) channels...
Page 359 - April 1859 the attention of the Government of India and of the several Local Governments had been drawn by the present Earl of Derby, who was then Secretary of State, to the expediency of imposing a compulsory rate to defray the expenses of schools for the rural population. The measure did not at that time find favor at Madras, the Government, at the head of which Sir Charles Trevelyan, being opposed to any compulsory taxation for educational purposes.
Page 30 - Should it become necessary to employ a larger force for the defence and protection of the Cochin territories against foreign invasion than is stipulated for by the preceding Article, the Rajah of Cochin agrees to contribute towards the discharge of the increased expense thereby incurred such a sum as shall appear to the Governor in Council of Fort St. George, on an...
Page 45 - Zemindars arising from the unbending forms of regulation procedure, that those tributaries should be exempted from the jurisdiction of the ordinary Courts and placed exclusively under the Collector of the District, in whom should be vested the entire administration of civil and criminal justice, under such rules for his guidance as might be prescribed by orders in Council. This proposal was approved by the Government, and forms the basis of Act XXIV of 1839.
Page 249 - Government guarantee interest varying in amount from 4 to 5 per cent. for a term of years* on all moneys paid with authority into their treasury, and should the profits in any half-year exceed the guaranteed interest, the surplus is equally divided between Government and the shareholders. (2) The Railway Company have the option of demanding repayment, upon their giving six months' notice of their intention to surrender the railway, of the whole of the capital duly expended upon the railway.

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