The Angler's Vade Mecum: Containing a Descriptive Account of the Water Flies, Their Seasons, and the Kind of Weather that Brings Them Most on the Water ... to which is Added, a Description of the Different Baits Used in Angling, and where Found

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A. Constable and Company, 1818 - Bait fishing - 128 pages
 

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Page 84 - ... and after you have made your cast, raise the point of your rod to prevent too much of your line from falling into the water ; properly no more should fall than what your flies are attached to. Manage so as to let your flies drop lightly on the water, which, with a little well directed practice, you will soon attain. Begin to fish at the head of a stream, and use caution, for there generally the best game lies, particularly when there are flies coming down the river. When you cast your flies across...
Page 92 - This species, commonly raised for the table (Fig. 319), consists of a footstalk, or stipes, ranging from an inch and a half to two inches and a half in height.
Page 83 - In casting your line and flies," says Carroll, "observe to make a semicircle with your rod, in order to avoid snapping your flies, and after you have made your cast, raise the point of your rod to prevent too much of your line from falling into the water ; properly no more should fall than what your flies are attached to. Manage so as to let your flies drop lightly on the water, which, with a little well directed practice, you will soon attain. Begin to fish at the head of a stream, and use caution,...
Page 85 - do not approve of the Kirby bend, particularly in large hooks ; they prefer the hook that is bent in a line with the shank, as being the best for holding a large fish." A hook ought never to be chosen whose point stands much outwards, as it often only scratches the fish without laying hold. The celebrated Limerick hooks made by O'Shaughnessy, by far the best tempered of any in the market, being capable of holding a fish of...
Page 101 - ... close and fast to the wire All being thus fitted, cast your fish up and down in such places as you know Pikes frequent, observing still that he sink some depth before you pull him up again. When the Pike cometh...
Page 101 - ... pike as he runs away with the bait, he will let it go, and will not be prevailed upon to take it again very soon, unless he be hungry indeed. When you have fixed your bait on your hook, with as little damage to it as possible, cast it up and down such places as you imagine the pike frequents ; let it sink a considerable depth before you pull it up again. When the pike comes you may sometimes perceive it by a motion in the water ; or at least you may feel it, which is the same thing. When this...
Page 76 - Icorcd with a knife, hang it up and cover it, but not too clofe, for the flies will blow it better covered than hanging in the open air. In two or three days after you...
Page 69 - Is commonly found in the hollow parts of seggs, near the roots. He has a black head and a whitish body.
Page 113 - ... take the chub, such as a black snail, with its belly slit to show the white: sometimes a worm, or any kind of fly, as the ant fly, flesh fly, dor or beetle, or a bob, which is a short, white worm, like to, but bigger than, a gentle, or a cod or case-worm ; he will take any of these very well, and never refuses a grasshopper at the top of a swift stream, or a young wasp-grub at the bottom. These grubs are found in the holes of banks, and discovered by the old ones going in and out, and are often...

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