The Human Experience: Description, Explanation, and Judgment

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2007 - Psychology - 293 pages
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The Human Experience is a comprehensive text that examines, analyzes and applies theories of humans, environments and human-environment interaction to professional thinking and action. Through the lens of their original theory, Explanatory Legitimacy, the authors differentiate descriptive from explanatory theories, and analyze the purposive, epistemological, and value base of theory in six major theoretical domains: longitudinal theories or those concerned with passages over time, environmental theories or those concerned with sets of conditions both interior and exterior to the body, categorical theories or those that parse populations into groups, systems theories which look at relationships among parts of wholes, and contemporary and emerging theories that advance pluralism as desirable and relevant to the 21st century. The authors highlight the previously unexamined values and assumptions that underlie theory, its generation and its use in professional practice and challenge the reader to answer two questions throughout the book: how do we know, and what do we do with our knowledge? Significant critical emphasis is devoted to diversity of humans and environments and the value-perimeter in which professionals create, analyze and use theory for decisions and activity.
 

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Contents

V
3
VI
15
VII
25
VIII
41
IX
53
X
65
XI
67
XII
73
XIX
175
XX
187
XXI
201
XXII
203
XXIII
213
XXIV
223
XXV
235
XXVI
245

XIII
85
XIV
105
XV
125
XVI
139
XVII
147
XVIII
163
XXVII
255
XXVIII
263
XXIX
267
XXX
281
XXXI
293
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About the author (2007)

Elizabeth DePoy is jointly appointed as professor in the School of Social work and professor and coordinator for interdisciplinary disability education at the Center for Community Inclusion and Disability Studies. She is a nationally and internationally recognized scholar for her work in developing Explanatory Legitimacy theory with Dr. Gilson, and for her substantive foci in research and evaluation methods, theory of human diversity, and geostatistical and mixed methohds of inquiry. She received a Fulbright Scholarship in 2003, has authored and co-authored seven books combined, has contributed chapters to numerous edited collections, and has published over 50 peer reviewed articles.

Stephen Gilson, Ph.D. is professor in the school of social work, and professor and co-coordinator for interdisciplinary disability studies at the Center for Community Inclusion and Disability Studies, University of Maine.

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