Telecommunications, Mass Media, and Democracy: The Battle for the Control of U.S. Broadcasting, 1928-1935

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Oxford University Press, Jan 26, 1995 - Business & Economics
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This work shows in detail the emergence and consolidation of U.S. commercial broadcasting economically, politically, and ideologically. This process was met by organized opposition and a general level of public antipathy that has been almost entirely overlooked by previous scholarship. McChesney highlights the activities and arguments of this early broadcast reform movement of the 1930s. The reformers argued that commercial broadcasting was inimical to the communication requirements of a democratic society and that the only solution was to have a dominant role for nonprofit and noncommercial broadcasting. Although the movement failed, McChesney argues that it provides important lessons not only for communication historians and policymakers, but for those concerned with media and how they are used.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
General Order 40 and the Emergence of Commercial
12
The Payne Fund and Ferment
38
Nonprofit Broadcasters
63
of the Status Quo
107
The Battle for Public Opinion
151
The Statutory Consolidation
188
The Ideological Consolidation
226
Conclusion
252
Efforts Thereafter
260
Notes
271
Selected Bibliography
351
Index
377
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