Spoken Miracles: A Companion to the Disappearance of the Universe

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Hay House, 2007 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 183 pages
2 Reviews
Spoken Miracles is an anecdotal account of Martha Luca Espinosa’s 30-year-long search for answers from God, as well as the result of a request that has been made by thousands of readers of author Gary R. Renard’s The Disappearance of the Universe, lovingly called “D.U.” Near the end of D.U., one of Gary’s teachers mentions that there were 365 quotations from the modern spiritual guide A Course in Miracles (ACIM) used in the D.U. book. We are told also that if these quotations were read on their own, they could either be used as a thought for the day throughout the year, or they could simply be read like a book, in which case they would constitute a “refresher course” by Jesus, the Voice of A Course in Miracles.
Many people requested that these quotations be put into book form, but it was a bigger job than most realized. Gary and his teachers  had used more than 11,000 words from ACIM during the course of their discussions. Additionally, inspiration guides this book to be written in a way that it can stand on its own, to help introduce people to both D.U. and A Course in Miracles, as well as to inspire and entertain a little, so it includes a short story as a way to introduce readers to the basic concepts of these remarkable and miraculous books.

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Review: Spoken Miracles: A Companion to "The Disappearance of the Universe"

User Review  - Goodreads

Jesus has never stopped speaking, HE is ever present, and His message is always the same: a Gospel of Inclusion where no one is left behind. Read full review

Spoken Miracles

User Review  - dooooood - Overstock.com

Finally someone put this together in one book I Love It!! Read full review

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About the author (2007)

David Dyergrew up in a coastal town in NSW, Australia, and graduated as dux of his high school in 1984. After commencing a degree in medicine and surgery at the University of Sydney, he soon decided it was not for him.

David went on to train as a ship's officer at the Australian Maritime College, travelling Australia and the world in a wide range of merchant ships. He graduated from the college with distinction and was awarded a number of prizes, including the Company of Master Mariners Award for highest overall achievement in the course. He then returned to the University of Sydney to complete a combined degree in Arts and Law. David was awarded the Frank Albert Prize for first place in Music I, High Distinctions in all English courses and First Class Honours in Law. From the mid-1990s until early 2000s David worked as a litigation lawyer in Sydney, and then in London at a legal practice whose parent firm represented the Titanic's owners back in 1912. In 2002 David returned to Australia and obtained a Diploma in Education from the University of New England, and commenced teaching English at Kambala, a school for girls in Sydney's eastern suburbs.

David has had a life-long obsession with the Titanic and has become an expert on the subject. In 2009 he was awarded a Commonwealth Government scholarship to write The Midni

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