A History of the Rise and Progress of the Arts of Design in the United States, Volume 3

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C.E. Goodspeed & Company, 1918 - Art
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Page 40 - When he was silent, he was a better sitter than before ; for he assumed a countenance that did not belong to him, as though he were thinking of a frontispiece for
Page 162 - Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: but a woman that feareth the Lord, she shall be praised. Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her own works praise her in the gates.
Page 90 - I painted, and left a number of pictures ; among these were halflength portraits 'of my friend Mr. Coleridge, and my medical friend, Mr. King, of Clifton. I have painted but few portraits, and these I think are my best.
Page 155 - ... their principles my own ; for these which have stood best the criticism of ages, are produced on principles of truth, and on no abstract notion of the sublime or beautiful. The artists were gifted with a keen perception of the beautiful of nature, and imitated it in simplicity and single-heartedness. They did not sit down, as the modern artist too often does, with a preconceived notion of what is or ought to be beautiful ; but their beau ideal was the choicest of nature. They often introduced...
Page 140 - This book was my companion day and night— nothing could separate us — my usual avocations were neglected — painting was all in all to me. I had made some proficiency in drawing, and had engraved a little, both in wood and copper, but not until now, had my passion...
Page 227 - When I went, the other morning, into the huge room in which I propose to execute my statue, I felt like a spoilt boy, who, after insisting upon riding on horseback, bawls aloud with fright at finding himself in the saddle, so far from the ground! I hope, however, that this will wear off.
Page 271 - ... a collection of tolerably well-arranged portraits. It is a great pity ; every lover of the art must grieve to see the first efforts of a young country so unhappily misdirected. There were several painters in America, who would have made a magnificent affair of that which is handled like a tapestry-weaver by Mr Trumbull. Yet Mr Trumbull was a. man of considerable power. His well-known
Page 226 - It was not until I had run through all the galleries and studios of Rome, and had under my eye the genial forms of Italy, that I began to feel Nature's value. I had before adored her, but as a Persian does the sun, with my face to the ground.
Page 284 - Bread a little of the latest in a strange land. His name is Bridges and his Profession Painting, and if you have any employment for him in that way he will be proud of obeying your command. He has drawn my children and several others in this neighbourhood, and tho...
Page 154 - And what I believe contributes to the enjoyment of being there, is the delightful freedom from the common cares and business of life — the vortex of politics and utilitarianism, that is forever whirling at home.

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