The History of the Life and Adventures of Mr. Anderson

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Broadview Press, Nov 13, 2008 - Fiction - 242 pages
2 Reviews

In 1754 the British adventurer, compiler, and novelist Edward Kimber published The History of the Life and Adventures of Mr. Anderson. Rooted in a tale Kimber heard while exploring the Atlantic seaboard, Mr. Anderson is the novelist’s transatlantic tale of slavery, Indian relations, and frontier life. Having been kidnapped in England, transported across the Middle Passage, and sold to a brutal Maryland planter as a white slave, Tom Anderson gains his freedom and in rapid succession becomes a successful trader, a war hero, and a friend to slave, Indian, Quebecois, and Englishman alike. Still engaging 250 years after its original publication, Mr. Anderson offers a rich and varied portrayal of the mid-eighteenth-century Atlantic world.

This Broadview edition features an introduction by both a literary scholar and a historian, elaborating on significant themes in the novel. The appendices include an extensive selection of documents—some unpublished elsewhere—further contextualizing many of those themes, including slavery, British representations of colonial America, and eighteenth-century British literature’s emphasis on sensibility and the “cult of feeling.”

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Review: The History of the Life and Adventures of Mr. Anderson

User Review  - Jamie Clegg - Goodreads

Painful. Unless you're looking at it contextually, as an ancestor of the modern novel, as well as a component of transatlantic literary history. Other than that...I definitely wouldn't. Ever. Read full review

Review: The History of the Life and Adventures of Mr. Anderson

User Review  - Martin Michalek - Goodreads

It was alright. The didacticism becomes predictable, and overly moral characters are so passe, but it's still pretty good. More interesting as a contextualization of the early novel and transatlantic relations than anything else. Read full review

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About the author (2008)

Matthew Mason and Nicholas Mason are Assistant Professor of History and Associate Professor of English, respectively, at Brigham Young University.

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