Shenandoah Religion: Outsiders and the Mainstream, 1716-1865

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Baylor University Press, 2002 - Religion - 247 pages

By surveying the religiously pluralistic setting of the eighteenth and early-nineteenth-century Shenandoah Valley, Longenecker reveals how the fabric of American pluralism was woven. Calling worldliness the "mainstream" and otherworldliness, "outsidernesss," Shenandoah Religion describes the transition certain denominations made in becoming mainstream and the resistance of others in maintaining distinctive dress, manners, social relations, economics, and apolitical viewpoints.

 

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Contents

Introduction
3
The Valley
13
The American Revolution
31
The Methodist Revolution
59
The Market Revolution
79
The Slavery Debate
113
The Civil War
153
Conclusions
183
Notes
189
Selected Bibliography
225
Index
239
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

STEPHEN L. LONGENECKER is Professor of History at Bridgewater College in Bridgewater, Virginia. A graduate of John Hopkins University (M.A. and Ph.D.), Longenecker is the author of Selma's Peacemaker: Ralph E. Smeltzer and Civil Rights Mediation (1987) and Piety and Tolerance: Pennsylvania German Religion, 1700-1850 (1994).

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