The Poison Diaries

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Jul 20, 2010 - Juvenile Fiction - 288 pages
23 Reviews

In the right dose, everything is a poison. Even love . . .

Jessamine Luxton has lived all her sixteen years in an isolated cottage near Alnwick Castle, with little company apart from the plants in her garden. Her father, Thomas, a feared and respected apothecary, has taught her much about the incredible powers of plants: that even the most innocent-looking weed can cure -- or kill.

When Jessamine begins to fall in love with a mysterious boy who claims to communicate with plants, she is drawn into the dangerous world of the poison garden in a way she never could have imagined . . .

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - sunset_x_cocktail - LibraryThing

2.5 stars I don't quite know what to make of this one. Another book I found looking for books for a reading challenge. I found the subject quite fascinating and I did quite like the a first half of ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Corazie - LibraryThing

I bought this book at Alnwick Castle, where the gated Poison Garden really strikes you as powerful - even more so once you have read this book. Visiting the Poison Garden at Alnwick Gardens can only ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
14
Section 3
15
Section 4
24
Section 5
25
Section 6
38
Section 7
39
Section 8
57
Section 17
131
Section 18
146
Section 19
147
Section 20
158
Section 21
170
Section 22
186
Section 23
187
Section 24
200

Section 9
58
Section 10
75
Section 11
90
Section 12
91
Section 13
102
Section 14
103
Section 15
114
Section 16
115
Section 25
216
Section 26
217
Section 27
230
Section 28
231
Section 29
250
Section 30
266
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Maryrose Wood is the author of The Mysterious Howling and The Hidden Gallery, the first two books in this continuing series about the Incorrigible children and their governess. These books may be considered works of fiction, which is to say the true bits and the untrue bits are so thoroughly mixed together that no one should be able to tell the difference. This process of fabrication is fully permitted under the terms of the author's Poetic License, which is one of her most prized possessions.

Maryrose's other qualifications for writing these tales include a scandalous stint as a professional thespian, many years as a private governess to two curious and occasionally rambunctious pupils, and whatever literary insights she may have gleaned from living in close proximity to a clever but disobedient dog.

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