State-worthies: or, The statesmen and favourites of England from the reformation to the revolution ...

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Printed for J. Robson, 1766 - Favorites, Royal
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Page 166 - And as far as it may lie in you, let no arbitrary power be intruded : the people of this kingdom love the laws thereof, and nothing will oblige them more, than a confidence of the free enjoying of them : what the nobles upon an occasion once said in parliament, " Nolumus leges Angliae mutari," is imprinted in the hearts of all the people.
Page 62 - ... and dearest viands sea or land could afford. And all this once seen, and having feasted the eyes of the invited, was in a manner...
Page 17 - Baltimore; where, you may be sure, coming from sea, they will first fortify, and learn the strength of the rebels, before they dare take the field. Howsoever, as I know you will not lessen...
Page 93 - My father, in the time of Queen Mary, being noted and known to be an enemy to Popery, was so cruelly threatened and so narrowly observed by those that maliced his religion, that for the safeguard of himself and my mother, who was wholly affected as my father, he knew no way so secure as to fly into Germany...
Page 574 - ... and peace of the people, or from receiving any obedience from them, without which no government can provide for them, that you may very reasonably believe that God hath not been...
Page 112 - God solemn thanks ; that he never gave his body to physic, nor his heart to cruelty, nor his hand to corruption. In three things he did much applaud his own success ; in his fair fortune with his wife, in his happy study of the laws, and in his free coming by all his offices, nee prece, nee pretio ; neither begging nor bribing for preferment.
Page 47 - It is a shameful and unblessed thing to take the scum of people and wicked condemned men, to be the people with whom you plant; and not only so, but it spoileth the plantation ; for they will ever live like rogues, and not fall to work, but be lazy, and do mischief, and spend victuals, and be quickly weary, and then certify over to their country to the discredit of the plantation.
Page 452 - He was very earnest that he might have the liberty to keep on his hat ; it was denied : he requested he might have the privilege to keep his cloak about him — neither could that be granted. Then, with a most undaunted courage, he went up to the top of that prodigious gibbet.
Page 522 - When the city of Exeter was besieged by the parliamentary forces, so that only the south side thereof, towards the sea, was open unto it, incredible numbers of larks were found in that open quarter ; for multitude, like quails in the wilderness...
Page 302 - STRAFFORD'S DEATH. I LOOKED upon my Lord of Strafford as a gentleman whose great abilities might make a prince rather afraid than ashamed to employ him in the greatest affairs of State. For those were prone to create in him great confidence of undertakings, and this was like enough to betray him to great errors...

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