An Inland Voyage

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1st World Publishing, Sep 1, 2004 - Biography & Autobiography - 140 pages
1 Review
Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. Visit us online at www.1stWorldLibrary.ORG - - To equip so small a book with a preface is, I am half afraid, to sin against proportion. But a preface is more than an author can resist, for it is the reward of his labours. When the foundation stone is laid, the architect appears with his plans, and struts for an hour before the public eye. So with the writer in his preface: he may have never a word to say, but he must show himself for a moment in the portico, hat in hand, and with an urbane demeanour. It is best, in such circumstances, to represent a delicate shade of manner between humility and superiority: as if the book had been written by some one else, and you had merely run over it and inserted what was good. But for my part I have not yet learned the trick to that perfection; I am not yet able to dissemble the warmth of my sentiments towards a reader; and if I meet him on the threshold, it is to invite him in with country cordiality.
 

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Review: An Inland Voyage

User Review  - Michael - Goodreads

This is Stevenson's first published book and a charming one. When he was writing (1876) there doesn't seem to have been a distinct travel-book genre. You sense he's feeling his way. But with ... Read full review

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Contents

ANTWERP TO BOOM
7
ON THE WILLEBROEK CANAL
12
THE ROYAL SPORT NAUTIQUE
18
AT MAUBEUGE
24
ON THE SAMBRE CANALISED TO QUARTES
29
PONTSURSAMBRE WE ARE PEDLARS
35
PONTSURSAMBRE THE TRAVELLING MERCHANT
41
ON THE SAMBRE CANALISED TO LANDRECIES
47
ORIGNY SAINTEBENOITE THE COMPANY AT TABLE
79
DOWN THE OISE TOMOY
86
LA FERE OF CURSED MEMORY
92
DOWN THE OISE THROUGH THE GOLDEN VALLEY
98
NOYON CATHEDRAL
101
DOWN THE OISE TO COMPIEGNE
106
AT COMPIEGNE
109
CHANGED TIMES
114

AT LANDRECIES
53
SAMBRE AND OISE CANAL CANAL BOATS
58
THE OISE IN FLOOD
64
ORIGNY SAINTEBENOITE A BYDAY
72
CHURCH INTERIORS
120
PRECY AND THE MARIONNETTES
127
BACK TO THE WORLD
138
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Novelist, poet, and essayist Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh, Scotland. A sickly child, Stevenson was an invalid for part of his childhood and remained in ill health throughout his life. He began studying engineering at Edinburgh University but soon switched to law. His true inclination, however, was for writing. For several years after completing his studies, Stevenson traveled on the Continent, gathering ideas for his writing. His Inland Voyage (1878) and Travels with a Donkey (1878) describe some of his experiences there. A variety of essays and short stories followed, most of which were published in magazines. It was with the publication of Treasure Island in 1883, however, that Stevenson achieved wide recognition and fame. This was followed by his most successful adventure story, Kidnapped, which appeared in 1886. With stories such as Treasure Island and Kidnapped, Stevenson revived Daniel Defoe's novel of romantic adventure, adding to it psychological analysis. While these stories and others, such as David Balfour and The Master of Ballantrae (1889), are stories of adventure, they are at the same time fine studies of character. The Master of Ballantrae, in particular, is a study of evil character, and this study is taken even further in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886). In 1887 Stevenson and his wife, Fanny, went to the United States, first to the health spas of Saranac Lake, New York, and then on to the West Coast. From there they set out for the South Seas in 1889. Except for one trip to Sidney, Australia, Stevenson spent the remainder of his life on the island of Samoa with his devoted wife and stepson. While there he wrote The Wrecker (1892), Island Nights Entertainments (1893), and Catriona (1893), a sequel to Kidnapped. He also worked on St. Ives and The Weir of Hermiston, which many consider to be his masterpiece. He died suddenly of apoplexy, leaving both of these works unfinished. Both were published posthumously; St. Ives was completed by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch, and The Weir of Hermiston was published unfinished. Stevenson was buried on Samoa, an island he had come to love very much. Although Stevenson's novels are perhaps more accomplished, his short stories are also vivid and memorable. All show his power of invention, his command of the macabre and the eerie, and the psychological depth of his characterization.

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