Bulletin of the United States Geological and Geographical Survey of the Territories

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1875
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Page 29 - ... such a victory as they could not afford to gain again, and they were glad when the long fight was over to follow their wives and little ones to the South. There in the deserts of Arizona, on well-nigh unapproachable isolated bluffs, they built new towns, and their few descendants — the Moquis — live in them to this day, preserving more carefully and purely the history and veneration, of their forefathers, than their skill or wisdom.
Page 28 - ... Formerly, the aborigines inhabited all this country we had been over as far west as the head-waters of the San Juan, as far north as the Rio Dolores, west some distance into Utah, and south and south-west throughout Arizona and on down into Mexico. They had lived there from time immemorial — since the earth was a small island, which augmented as its inhabitants multiplied. They cultivated the valley...
Page 416 - I communicate also a statistical view, procured and forwarded by him, of the Indian nations inhabiting the Territory of Louisiana...
Page 22 - Ruins of half a dozen lesser houses were found near by, but all in such exposed situations as to be quite dilapidated. Some had been crushed by the overhanging wall falling upon them, and others had lost their foot-hold and tumbled down the precipice. One little house in particular, at the extremity of this ledge, about fifty rods below the one described above, was especially unique in the daring of its site, filling the mind with amazement at the temerity of the builders and the extremity to which...
Page 19 - Small buildings, not more than 8 feet square, were often found standing alone apparently ; no trace of any other being detected in their immediate neighborhood. We now commenced to note another peculiar feature. Upon our right, the long slopes of protruding strata and debris formed promontories, extending out into the canon. Upon these, and not more than 50 feet above the stream, we found frequent indications of their having been occupied by some sort of works, the foundations of which in...
Page 18 - a succession of benches, one above the other, and connected by the steep slopes of the talus. Side-canons penetrate the mesa, and ramify it in every direction, always presenting a perpendicular face, so that it is only at very rare intervals that the top can be reached." Mr Ingersoll says: "Imagine East River a thousand or twelve hundred feet deep, and drained dry, the piers and slips on both sides made of red sandstone, and extending down to that depth, and yourself at the bottom, gazing up for...
Page 39 - Notes on some fossils from near the eastern base of the Rocky Mountains , west of Greeley and Evans, Colorado, and others about two hundred miles farther eastward, with descriptions of a few new species, in: Bull.
Page 369 - If we were to regard tbeaffinities of the plants merely, and to compare them with the Miocene of other countries, and also to consider the fact that several of the species are identical with those still living, and that the whole faciès of the flora coincides with that of modern temperate America, little hesitation would be felt in assigning the formation in which they occur to the Miocene period. On the other hand, when we consider the fact that the lower beds of this formation hold the remains...
Page 21 - The ground-plan showed a front room about 6 by 9 feet in dimensions, and back of it two smaller ones, the face of the rock forming their back walls. These were each about 5 by 7 feet square. The left hand of the two back rooms projected beyond the front room in an L. The cedar beams, which had divided the house into two floors, were gone, with the exception of a few splintered pieces and ends remaining in the wall, just enough to show what they were made of. We had some little doubt as to whether...
Page 420 - The advertisement of the proprietor of this edition says: "The great demand for the Journal of Lewis & Clarke, has induced the republication of the work, with the additions of extensive and interesting notes, and numerous illustrations on wood. We have divided the work into Chapters, with appropriate captions, corrected much that was erroneous in the Topography, and especially in the Nomenclature and Orthography of the Proper Names, and the Philological errors (of which there were many,) have been...

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