Howards End

Front Cover
Random House Publishing Group, Oct 30, 2007 - Fiction - 400 pages
First published in 1910, Howards End is the novel that earned E. M. Forster recognition as a major writer. Soon to be a limited series on Starz.

At its heart lie two families—the wealthy and business-minded Wilcoxes and the cultured and idealistic Schlegels. When the beautiful and independent Helen Schlegel begins an impetuous affair with the ardent Paul Wilcox, a series of events is sparked—some very funny, some very tragic—that results in a dispute over who will inherit Howards End, the Wilcoxes' charming country home. 

As much about the clash between individual wills as the clash between the sexes and the classes, Howards End is a novel whose central tenet, "Only connect," remains a powerful prescription for modern life.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Ken-Me-Old-Mate - LibraryThing

Howards End by E.M. Forster I don't know what you would make of this if you weren't English. In some ways it would be like watching an English film with subtitles that were written by someone who ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - amerynth - LibraryThing

I enjoyed E.M. Forster's novel "Howards End," which is about two sisters, Margaret and Helen, who have rather romantic ideals and are surrounded by hard-knock life sort of folks. The titular Howards ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
5
Section 3
32
Section 4
48
Section 5
79
Section 6
85
Section 7
110
Section 8
116
Section 16
210
Section 17
265
Section 18
272
Section 19
279
Section 20
285
Section 21
310
Section 22
315
Section 23
318

Section 9
124
Section 10
149
Section 11
162
Section 12
170
Section 13
181
Section 14
191
Section 15
200
Section 24
336
Section 25
339
Section 26
354
Section 27
359
Section 28
365
Section 29
374
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Edward Morgan Forster was born January 1, 1879 in London and was raised from infancy by his mother and paternal aunts after his father's death. Forster’s boyhood experiences at the Tonbridge School, Kent were an unpleasant contrast to the happiness he found at home, and his suffering left him with an abiding dislike of the English public school system. At King’s College, Cambridge, however he was able to pursue freely his varied interests in philosophy, literature and Mediterranean civilization, and he soon determined to devote his life to writing.

His first two novels, Where Angels Fear to Tread (1905) and The Longest Journey (1907), were both poorly received, and it was not until the publication of Howards End, in 1910, that Forster achieved his first major success as a novelist, with the work many considered his finest creation.

Forster first visited India during 1912 and 1913, and after three years as a noncombatant in Alexandria, Egypt, during World War I and several years in England, he returned for an extended visit in 1921. From those experiences came his most celebrated novel, A Passage to India, his darkest and most probing work and perhaps the best novel about India written by a foreigner.

As a man of letters , Forster was honored during and after World War II for his resistance to any and all forms of tyranny and totalitarianism, and King’s College awarded him a permanent fellowship in 1949. Forster spent his later years at Cambridge writing and teaching, and died at Coventry, England, on June 7, 1970. His novel, Maurice, written several decades earlier, was published posthumously in 1971.

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