Meltdown: The Predictable Distortion of Global Warming by Scientists, Politicians, and the Media

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Cato Institute, 2005 - Nature - 271 pages
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Why do scientists so often offer dire predictions about the future of the environment? In Meltdown, climatologist Patrick Michaels argues that the way we do science today creates a culture of exaggeration and a political comunity that then takes credit for having saved us from certain doom.
 

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Meltdown : The Predictable Distortion of Global Warming by Scientists, Politicians, and the Media

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This spirited critique challenges the conventional doom saying about global warming. Climatologist Michaels acknowledges that the earth is warming because of anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide ... Read full review

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I have read Meltdown as well as The Satanic Gases (2000) by Michaels. Both books are very well researched and provide an excellent counter-arguement to global warming theory.
Pat Michaels, and
James Hansen, the so-called godfather of global warming theory, have been debating since the early 1980s. From then till now, 2008, it would seem that Michaels hs been right and Hansen not only wrong, but well off the mark. Michaels uses temperature records to make future warming whereas Hansen relies on computer models. Based on his method, Michaels had noted that carbon dioxide has increased 70% in the atmosphere since the 1940's yet the Earth has responded with no more than a 0.5 C warming.
Hansen had predicted more than 1.0 C by 1998 alone and continues to promote the hysteria of a climate out of control. Michaels is a welcome breath of fresh air from that kind of rhetoric.
Any open-minded person concerned about global warming should definitely read this book. Recent evidence (2008) from satellite temperatures data sets in the atmosphere have shown remarkably that no 'net' global warming has taken place since 1998, possibly as far back as 1995. Michaels was right about that and he is probably right with other claims he makes in the book that are contrary to current theory.
 

Contents

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About the author (2005)

Patrick J. Michaels is Distinguished Senior Fellow in the School of Public Policy at George Mason University and senior fellow in environmental studies at the Cato Institute. He is past president of the American Association of State Climatologists, winner of the American Library Association s worldwide competition for public service writing, and an author of the 2003 climate science Paper of the Year, awarded by the Association of American Geographers.

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