Naval Strategy Compared and Contrasted with the Principles and Practice of Military Operations on Land: Lectures Delivered at U.S. Naval War College, Newport, R.I., Between the Years 1887 and 1911

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Little, Brown,, 1911 - Naval art and science - 475 pages
 

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Contents

Necessity for Naval Officers to keep themselves acquainted with general
67
Attempted political concentration of Dutch and English Republics
68
Naval Events in the Mediterranean
74
Necessity of Permanent Positions to effective naval action
76
Specific military importance of Mediterranean 16881713
87
Strategic insight of William III
93
Peace between France and Allies 1697
96
Notable Subsequent Change
102
Effect upon Great Britain of changes in International Conditions
109
Division of Dutch and English Navies 1652
115
Influence of Steam
118
Value of knowledge of Land Warfare to paval students
121
War a Business of Positions
127
Illustration from letter of Admiral Rodney
133
Strategic Positions largely determined by roads especially by cross
139
Strength of Positions
141
Torpedo Vessels and Submarines
147
Offensive Strength of seaports analyzed and discussed
153
Supreme need of Docks
161
Instances
167
Problem of uniting a Fleet when divided between several ports
173
Primary importance among these of the Battle Fleet
176
Lord Kitchener quoted
182
Analogy in Egyptian Expedition to Bonapartes Campaign in Italy 1796
190
Desirable number and character of such Stations
196
Order of importance in such distant bases
202
Modern instances of great Maritime Expeditions
208
Consequent probable necessity of Battle
215
Necessity for sustained Concentration of an invading naval force Illus
221
Athenian Expedition against Syracuse Analyzed and Discussed
228
Use to be made of an Inferior Navy under such conditions
232
Favorable effect of the Battle of the Nile upon British Naval dispositions
238
Gigantic naval diversion planned by Napoleon 1804
246
In such cases the method of the Fleet of the defensive is to take
292
Comment on these quotations
298
Two principal points of interest the Mouth of the Mississippi and
305
Comparative military unimportance of Gulf of Mexico west of Yucatan
311
Effect upon question of communications produced by the acquisition
314
Positional value of Key West
319
Command of such passages secured by a competent navy resting on
325
Best positions for controlling Windward Passage Santiago Guanta
327
Position of Havana superior in control to that of Santiago and
333
British use of Bahama Channel in attack upon Havana 1762
339
Consequent local advantage of United States over European countries
345
General discussion of question of transit in ocean or narrow seas
351
Deduction to be made from this value owing to distance from supports
357
Value of fortified ports instanced by Jamaica
363
Contrast between positions held by the United States in the Gulf
372
Weakness of the United States base on the Gulf as stated in 1887
375
Summary of the effect of the changes of tenures in the Caribbean in
381
Fortress Fleet and Fleet in Being
385
Necessity for precision in thought and in use of words
389
Fortress Fleet and Fleet in Being represent respectively defen
393
Nonacceptance by Japanese indicated by their general course
399
to be harmonized not by compromise but
405
Question as to amount of coal carried when starting on final stage
411
General military lesson deduced
412
The question of the supply vessels
419
Subsequent procedure evinces the same unity of conception
429
Consequent necessity for fortification on the land side
435
Conditions resulting from stationing Russian fleet at Port Arthur
441
Oversea interests and problems of the United States
447
262
449
Quotations from Archduke Charles and from Napoleon
457
Illustration from Land Warfare Napoleons Instructions to Marmont
471

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About the author (1911)

Alfred Thayer Mahan was born on September 27, 1840 at West Point, New York, where his father was a professor of Civil and Military Engineering at the U.S. Military Academy. He graduated from the Naval Academy in 1859 and embarked on a nearly 40-year naval career seeing duty in the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico against the Confederacy. He taught briefly at Annapolis, but spent most of his academic career at the newly founded Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, where he eventually served as president. He wrote twenty books during his lifetime including The Influence of Sea Power upon History, 1660-1783; The Influence of Sea Power upon the French Revolution and Empire, 1793-1812; The Interest of America in Sea Power, Present and Future; The Life of Nelson; and The Major Operations of the Navies in the War of American Independence. He died on December 1, 1914.

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