Naval Strategy Compared and Contrasted with the Principles and Practice of Military Operations on Land: Lectures Delivered at U.S. Naval War College, Newport, R.I., Between the Years 1887 and 1911

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Little, Brown,, 1911 - Naval art and science - 475 pages
 

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Contents

Disastrous effect of popular apprehensions upon military dispositions
39
To Frontier Attack and to Tactics
45
Analogy in Naval Tactics Trafalgar
47
Analysis of the nature of the advantage inherent in Central Position
53
Estimate of the value to be attributed to Concentratiou Central Posi
59
Cromwells Policy
65
Naval Events in the English Channel
71
Illustration from War between Japan and Uussia
75
Necessity of Permanent Positions to effective naval action
76
Subsequent Policy of the Stuart Kings
82
General European Alliance against France
88
Effect upon Savoy and upon French operations in Catalonia
94
Peace between France and Allies 1697
96
Notable Subsequent Change
102
Effect upon Great Britain of changes in International Conditions
109
Division of Dutch and English Navies 1652
115
Cause of delay in developing naval Strategic treatment
118
Value of knowledge of Land Warfare to naval students
121
War a Business of Positions
127
Illustration from letter of Admiral Rodney
133
Strategic Positions largely determined by roads especially by cross
139
Foundations and Principles
163
Value of Double Lines of Retreat or of Communication
169
Strategic questions involved in distant Transmarine Possessions
175
Primary importance among these of the Battle Fleet
176
Lord Kitchener quoted
182
Also in War between Japan and Russia
188
First essential military requisite of a Naval Station
195
Japanese and Russian Bases in Recent War
201
Lines of Operations and of Communications
207
Modern instances of great Maritime Expeditions
208
Bonaparte in Egypt and Malta Japan and Russia in Man
214
Necessity for sustained Concentration of an invading naval force Illus
221
Athenian Expedition against Syracuse Analyzed and Discussed
228
Use to be made of an Inferior Navy under such conditions 234
238
Elements essential to a serious defence
280
Difference in Control of strong places over movements of armies
286
In such cases the method of the Fleet of the defensive is to take
293
Comment on these quotations
298
Two principal points of interest the Mouth of the Mississippi and
305
Comparative military unimportance of Gulf of Mexico west of Yucatan
311
Effect upon question of communications produced by the acquisition
314
Positional value of Key West
317
Continuous Obstacle to passage of vessels presented by Cuba and Haiti
323
Influence of a Fleet so controlling Windward Passage upon a hostile force
326
Consequent inference as to necessary size of United States Navy
332
Ports very close to each other should be comprised in a single scheme
338
Consequent local advantage of United States over European countries
345
General discussion of question of transit in ocean or narrow seas
351
Deduction to be made from this value owing to distance from supports
357
Jamaica affords an illustration of the interest of the United States
363
Contrast between positions held by the United States in the Gulf
372
Weakness of the United States base on the Gulf as stated in 1887
375
Summary of the effect of the changes of tenures in the Caribbean in
381
Fortress Fleet and Fleet in Being
385
Necessity for precision in thought and in use of words
389
Fortress Fleet and Fleet in Being represent respectively defen
393
Nonacceptance by Japanese indicated by their general course
399
to be harmonized not by compromise but
405
Question as to amount of coal carried when starting on final stage
411
General military lesson deduced
412
The question of the supply vessels
419
Tactical measures to insure the strategic purpose of controlling
425
Necessity for taking risks
430
Consequent necessity for fortification on the land side
435
Conditions resulting from stationing Russian fleet at Port Arthur
441
Oversea interests and problems of the United States
447
In such operations the function of seacoast fortress by harboring fleets
457
Illustration of effect of leaving Windward Passage unguarded drawn
471

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