Christian Mission in the Modern World

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InterVarsity Press, 1975 - Religion - 128 pages
In recent years, the mission of the church has been defined in two almost exclusive ways. On the one hand are those who say the church must focus on evangelism and discipleship alone. On the other hand are those who advocate concentrating almost solely on societal reform. In this classic book, John Stott shows that Christian mission must encompass both evangelism and social action. He begins with careful definitions of five key terms--mission, evangelism, dialogue, salvation and conversion. Then, through a thorough biblical exploration of these concepts, Stott provides a model for ministry to people's spiritual and physical needs alike. Ultimately, Stott points to the example of Jesus, who modeled both the Great Commission of proclamation and the Great Commandment of love and service. This balanced, holistic approach to mission points the way forward for the work of the church in the world.

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User Review  - LouieLouie - LibraryThing

Came across this recently and discovered that it belongs to a long ago girlfriend. Tish, if you want your book back let me know :) Read full review

Contents

Foreword
7
Two Extreme Views
15
The Great Commission
22
Copyright

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About the author (1975)

John Stott was born in London, England on April 27, 1921. He converted to Christianity in 1938. He graduated with a double first in French and theology from Trinity College, Cambridge University. He was ordained in the Church of England in 1945. He published over 70 books between 1954 and 2010 including Personal Evangelism, Becoming a Christian, Parochial Evangelism by the Laity, Basic Christianity, The Cross of Christ, Issues Facing Christians Today, and The Radical Disciple. He died on July 27, 2011 at the age of 90.

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