From the South of France: The Roses of Monsieur Alphonse, The Poodle of Monsieur Gáillard, The Recrudescence of Madame Vic, Madame Jolicoeur's Cat, A Consolate Giantess, by Thomas A. Janvier ...

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Harper & Brothers, 1912 - 232 pages
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Page 179 - Monsieur Brisson was cut off from opportunity to reply to this outburst by Madame Jouval's abrupt departure. His loss of opportunity had its advantages. An adequate reply to her discharge of such a volley of home truths would have been difficult to frame. In the Vic bakery, between Madame Vic and Monsieur Fromagin, a discussion was in hand akin to that carried on between Monsieur Brisson and Madame Jouval — but marked with a somewhat nearer approach to accuracy in detail. Being sequent to the settlement...
Page 144 - Jolicoeur should assume her cap with an air of detachment and aloofness : as though no such entity as the Shah de Perse existed, and with an insisted-upon disregard of the fact that he was watching her alertly with his great golden eyes. Equally was it of the game that the Shah de Perse should affect — save for his alert watching — a like disregard of the doings of Madame...
Page 152 - Madame Jolicceur's feet: he a man of an age that is suitable, without being excessive; who has in the community an assured position; whose more than moderate wealth is known. I insist, therefore, that should she accept his homages she would do well." "And I insist," declared Madame Gauthier stoutly, "that should she turn her back upon the Major Gontard she would do most ill!
Page 163 - Returning across the Vieux Port in the bateau mouche, Monsieur Peloux no longer shuddered in dread of crime to be committed — his shuddering was for accomplished crime. On his bald head, unheeded, the gushing tears of shame accumulated in pools. When leaves of absence permitted him to make retirements to his coquette little estate at Les Martigues, the Major Gontard was as another Cincinnatus: with the minor differences that the lickerish cookings of the brave Marthe — his old femme de menage:...
Page 171 - Pave d'Amour. In the back of his head were justly self-condemnatory thoughts, to the general effect that he was a blackguard and deserved to be kicked. In the dominant front of his head, however, were thoughts of a more agreeable sort: of how he would find Madame Jolicceur all torn and rent by the bitter sorrow of her bereavement; of how he would pour into her harried heart a flood of sympathy by which that injured organ would be soothed and mollified; of how she would be lured along gently to requite...
Page 165 - Peloux was the promoter of a criminal conspiracy — could not have been other than they were. Equally does it follow that his doings produced the doings of the man with the bag. Pas de Lanciers is the little station at which one changes trains in going from Marseille to Les Martigues. Descending from a first-class carriage, the Major Gontard awaited the Martigues train — his leave was for two days, and his thoughts were engaged pleasantly with the breakfast that old Marthe would have ready for...
Page 156 - Madame shall continue to bestow, within reason, her affections upon Monsieur le Shah; and with them that brave animal — he is a cat of ten thousand — shall have my affections as well. Already, knowing my feeling for him, we are friends — as Madame shall see to her own convincing," Addressing himself in tones of kindly persuasion to the Shah de Perse, he added: "Viens, Monsieur!" — whereupon the Shah de Perse instantly jumped himself to the Major's knee and broke forth, in response to a savant...
Page 141 - Jolicceur grudgingly admitted, in the Persian royal catteries; but nowhere else in the Orient, and nowhere at all in the Occident, she declared with an energetic conviction, possibly could there be found a cat who even approached him in intellectual development, in wealth of interesting accomplishments, and, above all, in natural sweetness of disposition — a sweetness so marked that even under extreme provocation he never had been known to thrust out an angry paw. This is not to say that the Shah...
Page 164 - ... de Berre. Save in his professional relations with recalcitrant inhabitants of Northern Africa, he was of a gentle nature, this amiable warrior: ever kindly, when kindliness was deserved, in all his dealings with mankind. Equally, his benevolence was extended to the lower orders of animals — that it was understood, and reciprocated, the willing jumping of the Shah de Perse to his friendly knee made manifest — and was exhibited in practical ways. Naturally, he was a liberal contributor to the...
Page 161 - ... perceived with horror — but without repentance — the pit into which he descended. In his previous, always professional, meetings with criminals his position had been that of unassailable dominance. In his pending meeting — since he himself would be not only a criminal but an inciter to crime — he would be, in the essence of the matter, the under dog. Beneath his seemly black hat his bald head went whiter than even its normal deathly whiteness, and perspiration started from its every pore....

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