Village belles [by A. Manning] 3 vols, Volume 1

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Page 128 - As may express them best ; though what if earth Be but the shadow of heaven, and things therein Each to other like, more than on earth is thought...
Page 68 - As one who, long in populous city pent, Where houses thick and sewers annoy the air, Forth issuing on a summer's morn to breathe Among the pleasant villages and farms Adjoin'd, from each thing met conceives delight ; The smell of grain, or tedded grass, or kine, Or dairy, each rural sight, each rural sound...
Page 232 - But who is this, what thing of sea or land ? Female of sex it seems, That, so bedecked, ornate, and gay, Comes this way, sailing Like a stately ship Of Tarsus, bound for the isles Of Javan or Gadire, With all her bravery on, and tackle trim, Sails filled, and streamers waving...
Page 236 - Happiness is the natural design of all the world ; and everything we see done, is meant in order to attain it. My imagination places it in friendship, by friendship I mean an entire communication of thoughts, wishes, interests, and pleasures, being undivided ; a mutual esteem, which naturally carries with it a pleasing sweetness of conversation, and terminates in the desire of making one or another happy...
Page 104 - Behold the picture! Is it like ? Like whom ? The things that mount the rostrum with a skip, And then skip down again ; pronounce a text ; Cry — hem ; and reading what they never wrote Just fifteen minutes, huddle up their work, And with a well-bred whisper close the scene...
Page 249 - There is a quiet after the abandoning of pursuits, something like the rest that follows a laborious day. I tell you this for your comfort. It was formerly a terrifying view to me, that I should one day be an old woman. I now find that nature has provided pleasures for every state. Those are only unhappy who, will not be contented with what she gives, but strive to break through her laws, by affecting a perpetuity of youth, which appears to me as little desirable at present as the babies do to you,...
Page 239 - Besides, you can give me something in return," and, turning to Pauline, " Will you be so kind as to give me a glass of water ? No, nothing else, a glass of cold water ; I am dying of thirst." "And I," said Bettina, laughing, while Pauline ran to fetch the water, " I am dying of something else — of hunger, to tell the truth. Monsieur le Cure — I know that I am going to be dreadfully intrusive ; I see your cloth is laid...
Page 69 - Among the pleasant villages and farms Adjoin'd, from each thing met conceives delight, The smell of grain, or tedded grass, or kine, Or dairy, each rural sight, each rural sound; If chance, with nymph-like step, fair virgin pass What pleasing seem'd, for her now pleases more; She most, and in her look sums all delight...
Page 313 - ... such inseparable companions in all the daily occupations and amusements of their whole lives, that either might have addressed the other, in the language of fond recollection used by Helena to Hermia — " Is all the counsel that we two have shared.
Page 229 - My sentence is for open war: of wiles, More inexpert, I boast not: them let those Contrive who need, or when they need, not now, For while they sit contriving, shall the rest, Millions that stand in arms, and longing wait The signal to ascend, sit lingering here Heaven's fugitives, and for their dwelling-place Accept this dark opprobrious den of shame, The prison...

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