ADHD: Deceptive Diagnosis

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FOCUS PUB Incorporated, Sep 1, 2008 - Family & Relationships - 182 pages
1 Review
This book is about giving hope. It is for Christian parents who are floundering in the quagmire of unbiblical and contradictory ideas concerning ADD/ADHD. It is not a book on child psychology. ADHD: Deceptive Diagnosis will present the principles of biblical parenting as they pertain to the behaviors associated with the label ADHD. In America today, children are no longer considered to be capable of control over their actions, attitudes, or thoughts. Their lack of self-discipline, self-control and self-motivations, disobedience, and bad attitudes are defined as a disease.

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Review: ADHD: Deceptive Diagnosis

User Review  - Monica - Christianbook.com

I am a licensed therapist (18 years) and a Christian (32 years). I have worked with a number of people over the years that have been diagnosed with ADD/ADHD. It is true; some ADD/ADHD behaviors are ... Read full review

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How ironic that the book is published by Focus Pub. Evidently the writer and the publishing house do not understand medical science. As a Christian and therapist, and having worked in a Christian counseling facility, I am ashamed that ADHD is so horribly misinterpreted in this way. ADHD is a lack of being able to focus, Attention Deficit. If one has not had the disadvantage of having ADHD, then it is extremely difficult and next to impossible to understand the extreme difficulties that go with it. It is under diagnosed and over diagnosed, as well. It is extensively studied and medically proven, over and over again. How completely stupid, (yes, stupid) and incompetent to make such statements and deceive people that may need help, especially innocent children that cannot advocate for themselves. Directing parents in the incorrect direction of help is malpractice, except this is not a medical doctor, therefore should not be listened to on this subject in the first place. Diet and health habits may help some people, but that does not help all with ADHD. It is genetic in a large number of circumstances and now found that 2/3 of children with the correct diagnosis of ADHD go on to continue having the disorder in adulthood. With knowing the proper diagnosis, medical treatment including medicine if needed, cbt (cognitive behavioral therapy) and life style habits have to be developed by the person themselves, a person can live a normal, healthy life. The ADHD person has to figure for themselves how to adapt. in life. Suggestions can be made, but they have to figure what works for them. It has been shown that candy, sugar, such has no baring on ADHD behaviors or symptoms. Environment, especially how the person is treated and was treated has a lot to do with how they behave. If they were constantly bullies because they had little focus, and it was not detected that they had ADHD, how do you think they would act? Put yourself in their shoes for a change and just think about all they have gone through. That is not absolving them from their actions as no one is, but their attitudes, thoughts, motivations and levels of obedience can be directly related to how they are treated/by whom. It is all relative. Perception is everything. I suggest for further insight on this, read "Driven to Distraction" by Edward Hallowell. It is very insightful on the actual daily life of what a person with ADHD goes through and feels. Put yourself in their shoes and then look into actual medical research before making a decision on what one believes about ADHD. I fully believe the Bible. But God did give us a brain to use, and expects us to be wise and discerning.  

About the author (2008)

Dr. Tyler is Director of Gateway Biblical Counseling and Training Center in Fairview Heights, IL., and a member of several biblical counseling associations. He is author of Deceptive Diagnosis: When Sin is Called Sickness and several other publications.

Practicing pharmacist in the St. Louis area. Author, biblical counselor

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