Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Duty of Genius

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Free Press, 1990 - Biography & Autobiography - 654 pages
5 Reviews
Ludwig Wittgenstein is perhaps the greatest philosopher of the twentieth century, and certainly one of the most original in the entire Western tradition. Given the inaccessibility of his work, it is remarkable that he has inspired poems, paintings, films, musical compositions, titles of books -- and even novels. In his splendid biography, Ray Monk has made this very compelling human being come alive in a way that perfectly explains the fascination he has evoked. Wittgenstein's life was one of great moral and spiritual depth. Although his work addresses problems of logic, language, mind, and knowledge, he often described it as having an ethical point, and once said that he "could not help seeing every problem from a religious point of view." In successfully bridging the gap assumed by many to exist between Wittgenstein's life and his work, Monk's biography helps to explain the interest in Wittgenstein's later philosophy on the part of Buddhist scholars.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Bmortime - LibraryThing

This book is a sober account of a person who had a charismatic pull over many of the people that he influenced. I was interested in reading this biography to see how a philosopher's decisions in life ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - MSarki - LibraryThing

I found the going a little too long and just not worth my time, although the book gets high marks from most anybody I know and respect who have actually read it, or said they did. Read full review

Contents

Bartleys Wittgenstein and
117
The Unprintable Truth
169
An Entirely Rural Affair
192
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

Monk is a lecturer in philosophy at Southampton University and the acclaimed biographer of Russell and Wittgenstein.

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