Amelia, Volume 2

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A. Millar, 1752 - Domestic fiction
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Page 3 - By examining carefully the several gradations which conduce to bring every model to perfection, we learn truly to know that science in which the model is formed : as histories of this kind, therefore, may properly be called models of HUMAN LIFE; so by observing minutely the several incidents which tend to the catastrophe or completion of the whole, and the minute causes whence those incidents are produced, we shall best be instructed in this most useful of all arts, which I call the ART of LIFE.
Page 2 - I question much whether we may not, by natural means, account for the success of knaves, the calamities of fools, with all the miseries in which men of sense sometimes involve themselves, by quitting the directions of Prudence, and following the blind guidance of a predominant passion ; in short...
Page 6 - ... chosen out of those poor old decrepit people who are, from their want of bodily strength, rendered incapable of getting a livelihood by work. These men, armed only with a pole, which some of them are scarce able to lift, are to secure the persons and houses of his Majesty's subjects from the attacks of gangs of young, bold, stout, desperate, and well-armed villains.
Page 3 - Life may as properly be called an art as any other ; and the great incidents in it are no more to be considered as mere accidents, than the several members of a fine statue, or a noble poem.
Page 2 - To retrieve the ill consequences of a foolish conduct, and by struggling manfully with distress to subdue it, is one of the noblest efforts of wisdom and virtue. Whoever, therefore, calls such a man fortunate, is guilty of no less impropriety in speech than he would be who should call the statuary or the poet fortunate who carved a Venus or who writ an Iliad.
Page 7 - I have been sometimes inclined to think, that this office of a justice of peace requires some knowledge of the law : for this simple reason ; because, in every case which comes before him, he is to judge and act according to law. Again, as these laws are contained in a great variety of books, the statutes which relate to the office of a justice of peace...

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