Life and Administration of Edward, First Earl of Clarendon: Letters and papers, 1837

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Longman, Orme, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1837
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Page 42 - Bless us! what a word on A title-page is this! and some in file Stand spelling false, while one might walk to MileEnd Green. Why is it harder, sirs, than Gordon, Colkitto, or Macdonnel, or Galasp? Those rugged names to our like mouths grow sleek, That would have made Quintilian stare and gasp.
Page 205 - Castlemaine's enemy in this matter, I do promise upon my word to be his enemy as long as I live. You may show this letter to my lord lieutenant, and if you have both a mind to oblige me, carry yourselves like friends to me in this matter. CHARLES R.
Page 204 - I wish I may be unhappy in this world and the world to come if I fail in the least degree of what I have resolved, which is, of making my Lady Castlemaine of my wife's bedchamber. And whosoever I find use any endeavour to hinder this resolution of mine (except it be only to myself), I will be his enemy to the last moment of my life.
Page 64 - Worcester; and, being released with the rest of the king's servants, had* been employed, from the time of the king's return, in the same service under the chancellor; the man having, before the troubles, taught the king, and the duke of York, and the rest of the king's children to write, being indeed the best writer, in Latin as well as English, for the fairness of the hand, of any man in that time.
Page 240 - He keeps an exact journal of all that passes, and is punctual to tediousness in all that he relates. He was very early engaged in great secrets, for his father, apprehending of what fatal consequence it would have been to the king's affairs if his correspondence had been discovered by unfaithful secretaries, engaged him when very young to write all his letters to England in cipher ; so that he was generally half the day writing in cipher, or deciphering, and was so discreet, as well as faithful,...
Page 105 - A SEASONABLE ARGUMENT TO PERSUADE ALL THE GRAND JURIES IN ENGLAND TO PETITION FOR A NEW PARLIAMENT, OR A LIST OF THE PRINCIPAL LABOURERS IN THE GREAT DESIGN OF POPERY AND ARBITRARY POWER...
Page 113 - He was capable of great application: and was a man of a grave deportment; but stuck at nothing, and was ashamed of nothing. He was neither loved nor trusted by any man or any side: and he seemed to have no regard to common decencies...
Page 235 - it was time to publish it, and then read it again " to me. I told him by that time he had writ as " many declarations as I had done, he would find " they are a very ticklish commodity ; and that " the first care is to be that it shall do no hurt.
Page 205 - If you will oblige me eternally, make this business as easy as you can, of what opinion soever you are of, for I am resolved to go through with this matter, let what will come on it ; which again I solemnly swear before Almighty God. Therefore, if you desire to have the continuance of my friendship, meddle no more with this business...
Page 137 - Holland, a crafty fawning man, who was ready to turn to every side that was uppermost, and to betray those who by their former friendship and services thought they might depend on him...

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