French Revolutionary Syndicalism and the Public Sphere

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Cambridge University Press, Jul 4, 1996 - Political Science - 284 pages
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This study explores the interaction of the Confédération Générale du Travail (CGT) with the French public sphere, between 1900 and 1920. The CGT supported federalist worker control of industry, and, by World War I, had developed a distinctively productivist discourse, emphasizing increased material output through direction of the economy. Kenneth Tucker examines the triumph of this productivism in contrast with other visions of society and the future, while giving a Habermasian twist to the recent linguistic turn in labor history.
 

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Contents

Prologue
3
The Belle Epoque and revolutionary
13
Reconfiguring the language
31
Habermas Bourdieu and the new social
51
Visions of modernity in the liberal
69
The findesiecle public sphere
104
syndicalism
131
Reformulating revolutionary syndicalism
159
Taylorism
183
The legacy of syndicalism
209
Notes
218
Index
276
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