Agricultural Subsidies in the WTO Green Box: Ensuring Coherence with Sustainable Development Goals

Front Cover
Ricardo MelÚndez-Ortiz, Christophe Bellmann, Jonathan Hepburn
Cambridge University Press, Dec 3, 2009 - Business & Economics - 675 pages
Do the World Trade Organization's rules on 'green box' farm subsidies allow both rich and poor countries to achieve important goals such as food security, or do they worsen poverty, distort trade and harm the environment? Current WTO requirements set no ceiling on the amount of green box subsidies that governments can provide, on the basis that these payments cause only minimal trade distortion. Governments are thus increasingly shifting their subsidy spending into this category, as they come under pressure to reduce subsidies that are more directly linked to production. However, growing evidence nonetheless suggests that green box payments can affect production and trade, harm farmers in developing countries and cause environmental damage. By bringing together new research and critical thinking, this book examines the relationship between green box subsidies and the achievement of sustainable development goals, and explores options for future reform.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Overview I
1
The recent evolution of agricultural trade
17
Doha Round negotiations on the green box and beyond
36
The reform of the EUs Common Agricultural Policy
70
ALAN SWINBANK
84
Agricultural trade policy reform in Iapan
121
The focus extent and economic impact
135
European Union and France
258
The environmental impact of EU green box subsidies
468
The environmental impact of US green box subsidies
496
Biofuels subsidies and the green box
530
Improving monitoring and surveillance
571
options for achieving change
583
deviating from
604
options
618
Towards a green box subsidy regime that promotes
633

The distributional structure of US green box subsidies
304
A Chinese perspective on the green box
399
African countries and the green box
412
Text ofAnnex 2 0f the WTO Agreement
647
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Ricardo MelÚndez-Ortiz is co-founder and Chief Executive of the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD). His previous experience encompasses responsibility in a diverse range of capacities at the interface of international trade and sustainable development.

Christophe Bellmann is the Programmes Director at the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD). Before joining ICTSD, Mr Bellmann worked with the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), and with the Swiss Coalition of Development Organisations.

Jonathan Hepburn is Programme Officer for Agriculture at the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD). Before joining ICTSD, he represented Oxfam International to the World Bank and IMF in Washington D.C., and led Oxfam's global campaign on aid, debt and the Millennium Development Goals. Previously, he worked on trade, development and human rights issues with the Quaker United Nations Office, Geneva.

Bibliographic information