Arab Women Writers: An Anthology of Short Stories

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SUNY Press, Feb 16, 2012 - Literary Collections - 318 pages
A collection of sixty short stories by women writers from across the Arab world.

Consisting of sixty short stories by forty women writers from across the Arab world, this collection opens numerous windows onto Arab culture and society and offers keen insights into what Arab women feel and think. The stories deal not only with feminist issues but also with topics of a social, cultural, and political nature. Different styles and modes of writing are represented, along with a diversity of techniques and creative approaches, and the authors present many points of view and various ways of solving problems and confronting situations in everyday life. Lively, outspoken, and provocative, these stories are essential reading for anyone interested in the Arab world.

Dalya Cohen-Mor is an independent scholar educated in the Middle East, Europe, and the United States. She is the author of A Matter of Fate: The Concept of Fate in the Arab World as Reflected in Modern Arabic Literature and Yusuf Idris: Changing Visions, as well as the editor and translator of An Arabian Mosaic: Short Stories by Arab Women Writers.
 

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A good selection of short stories.

Contents

Part I Growing Up Female
29
Part II Love and Sexuality
59
Part III MaleFemale Relations
87
Part IV Marriage
111
Part V Childbearing
171
Part VI SelfFulillment
193
Part VII Customs and Values
221
Pat VIII The Winds of Change
257
Notes
291
About the Authors
297
Copyright

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Page 3 - I could do was to offer you an opinion upon one minor point - a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction...
Page 3 - Shakespeare's plays, for instance, seem to hang there complete by themselves. But when the web is pulled askew, hooked up at the edge, torn in the middle, one remembers that these webs are not spun in midair by incorporeal creatures, but are the work of suffering human beings, and are attached to grossly material things, like health and money and the houses we live in.
Page 3 - ... If opinions upon any of these matters had been chalked on the pavement, nobody would have stooped to read them' (p. 99). (c) (1) 'All human beings were laid asleep ... (p. 24). (2) 'We were all being shot backwards and forwards on this plain foundation to make some pattern' (p. 26). (3) '. . . for fiction, imaginative work that is, is not dropped like a pebble upon the ground, as science may be ..." (p. 43). (4) 'It was a sentence that was unsuited for a woman's use

About the author (2012)

Dalya Cohen-Mor is an independent scholar educated in the Middle East, Europe, and the United States. She is the author of A Matter of Fate: The Concept of Fate in the Arab World as Reflected in Modern Arabic Literature and Yusuf Idris: Changing Visions, as well as the editor and translator of An Arabian Mosaic: Short Stories by Arab Women Writers.

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