My Mother's Voice: Children, Literature, and the Holocaust

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Broadview Press, Dec 11, 2001 - Literary Criticism - 384 pages
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How do children's books represent the Holocaust? How do such books negotiate the tension between the desire to protect children, and the commitment to tell children the truth about the world? If Holocaust representations in children's books respect the narrative conventions of hope and happy endings, how do they differ, if at all, from popular representations intended for adult audiences? And where does innocence lie, if the children's fable of Roberto Benigni's Life is Beautiful is marketed for adults, and far more troubling survivor memoirs such as Anita Lobel's No Pretty Pictures: A Child of War are marketed for children? How should Holocaust Studies integrate discourse about children's literature into its discussions? In approaching these and other questions, Kertzer uses the lens of children's literature to problematize the ways in which various adult discourses represent the Holocaust, and continually challenges the conventional belief that children's literature is the place for easy answers and optimistic lessons.
 

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Contents

List of Illustrations
9
Preface
11
Maternal Voices
19
The Voices of Children
107
The Child in the Picture
195
History and Pedagogy
275
June 1963
363
Works Cited
367
Index
379
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Adrienne Kertzer is Professor and former Chair of the Department of English at The University of Calgary.

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