Aristotle's Treatise on Poetry, Translated: With Notes on the Translation, and on the Original : and Two Dissertations, on Poetical, and Musical, Imitation, Volume 2

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L. Hansard & Son, 1812 - Aesthetics
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Page 386 - Fire answers fire; and through their paly flames Each battle sees the other's umber'd face: Steed threatens steed, in high and boastful neighs Piercing the night's dull ear; and from the tents, The armourers, accomplishing the knights, With busy hammers closing rivets up, Give dreadful note of preparation.
Page 409 - The character of Lothario seems to have been expanded by Richardson into Lovelace ; but he has excelled his original in the moral effect of the fiction. Lothario, with gaiety which cannot be hated, and bravery which cannot be despised, retains too much of the spectator's kindness.
Page 289 - With quicken'd step, Brown Night retires : young Day pours in apace, And opens all the lawny prospect wide. The dripping rock, the mountain's misty top, Swell on the sight, and brighten with the dawn.
Page 84 - II n'est point de serpent ni de monstre odieux, Qui, par l'art imité, ne puisse plaire aux yeux : D'un pinceau délicat l'artifice agréable Du plus affreux objet fait un objet aimable.
Page 304 - Twas English cut on Greek and Latin, Like fustian heretofore on satin ; It had an odd promiscuous tone, As if h' had talk'd three parts in one ; Which made some think, when he did gabble, Th' had heard three labourers of Babel, Or Cerberus himself pronounce A leash of languages at once.
Page 31 - Cato affords a splendid exhibition of artificial and fictitious manners, and delivers just and noble sentiments, in diction easy...
Page 377 - Angelo has more of the poetical inspiration; his ideas are vast and sublime; his people are a superior order of beings; there is nothing about them, nothing in the air of their actions or their attitudes, or the style and cast of their limbs or features, that reminds us of their belonging to our own species.
Page 410 - Lovelace ; but he has excelled his original in the moral effect of the fiction. Lothario, with gaiety which cannot be hated, and bravery which cannot be despised, retains too much of the spectator's kindness. It was in the power of Richardson alone to teach us at once esteem and detestation, to make virtuous resentment overpower all the benevolence which wit, and elegance, and courage., naturally excite; and to lose at last the hero in the villain.
Page 437 - ... and their weight. It is one reason of Aristotle's to prove that tragedy is the more noble because it turns in a shorter compass; the whole action being circumscribed within the space of four-and-twenty hours. He might prove as well that a mushroom is to be preferred before a peach, because it shoots up in the compass of a night.
Page 197 - I have often observed that, on mimicking the looks and gestures of angry, or placid, or frighted, or daring men, I have involuntarily found my mind turned to that passion whose appearance I endeavoured to imitate...

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