Challenging Modern Physics: Questioning Einstein's Relativity Theories

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Universal-Publishers, 2005 - Science - 320 pages
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Newton's Laws held for 300 years until Einstein developed the 'special theory of relativity' in 1905. Experiments done since then show anomalies in that theory. This book starts with a description of the special theory of relativity. It is shown that Einstein was not the first to derive the famous equation E = mc2, which has become synonymous with his name. Next, experimental evidence that cannot be explained by special relativity is given. In the light of this evidence, the two basic postulates of the special theory of relativity on the behaviour of light are shown to be untenable. A new theory (universal relativity) is developed, which conforms to the experimental evidence. The movement of a conductor near a pole of a magnet and the movement of that pole near the conductor does not always give the same result. It has been claimed that this contradicts relativity theory. Experiments described in this book show that it is not special relativity but another basic law of physics that is contradicted - Faraday's Law. The Big Bang theory of the beginning of the universe is questioned and an alternative proposed. The source of much of the mysterious missing 'dark matter' that has been sought for decades by astronomers is located. An explanation of the shapes of some galaxies is proffered. This book presents an alternative to Einstein's special theory of relativity, solves many problems left unanswered by special relativity, gives a better fit to many phenomena and experimental data and is more philosophically appealing. It is recommended to all people interested in fundamental issues of physics and cosmology. Professor Andre Assis, Brazil The book treats its subject properly, not just as an impersonal set of equations, but rather as a developing saga full of human triumph and failure. One learns from both experimental results and simple logical argument that all is not well with modern physics. Dr. Neal Graneau, Oxford University, U.K. Irish engineer solves the dark secrets of space. Sunday Times, U.K. Einstein got relativity theory wrong. Bangkok Post, Thailand
 

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Contents

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Copyright

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Page ii - There was a young lady named Bright, Whose speed was far faster than light; She set out one day In a relative way And returned on the previous night.
Page 20 - The principle of relativity, according to which the laws of physical phenomena should he the same, whether for an observer fixed, or for an observer carried along in a uniform movement of translation; so that we have not and could not have any means of discerning whether or not we are carried along in such a motion.
Page 10 - A > B on the travelling train. Just when the flashes of lightning occur, this point M' naturally coincides with the point M, but it moves towards the right in the diagram with the velocity v of the train. If an observer sitting in the position M' in the train did not possess this velocity, then he would remain permanently at M, and the light rays emitted by the flashes of lightning A and B would reach him simultaneously, ie they would meet just where he is situated. Now in reality (considered with...
Page 10 - M' in the train did not possess this velocity, then he would remain permanently at M, and the light rays emitted by the flashes of lightning A and B would reach him simultaneously, ie they would meet just where he is situated. Now in reality (considered with reference to the railway embankment) he is hastening towards the beam of light coming from B, whilst he is riding on ahead of the beam of light coming from A. Hence the observer will see the beam of light emitted from B earlier than he will see...

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