Guide to the Battles of Chancellorsville & Fredericksburg

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Jay Luvaas, Harold W. Nelson
University Press of Kansas, 1994 - History - 360 pages
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The battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, 1862-63, were remarkable in several respects. Both revealed the problems of mounting a serious attack at night and provided the first examples of the now-familiar trench warfare. Fredericksburg featured street fighting and river crossings under fire. Chancellorsville was marked by Stonewall Jackson's death and the rare instance of mounted cavalry attacking infantry. In addition, the latter battle also demonstrated in striking fashion the profound influence of the commander on the battle. The Union committed more soldiers, supplies, money, and better equipment than did the Confederacy, and yet Lee won.

Eyewitness accounts by battle participants make these guides an invaluable resource for travelers and nontravelers who want a greater understanding of five of the most devastating yet influential years in our nation's history. Explicit directions to points of interest and maps—illustrating the action and showing the detail of troop position, roads, rivers, elevations, and tree lines as they were 130 years ago—help bring the battles to life. In the field, these guides can be used to recreate each battle's setting and proportions, giving the reader a sense of the tension and fear each soldier must have felt as he faced his enemy.

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Contents

Observations Fredericksburg
3
2 Establishing the Bridgehead
14
Stop 6 Local Situation around Hamiltons Crossing as Meade
41
Copyright

19 other sections not shown

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About the author (1994)

Jay Luvaas has been a scholar and teacher of military history for more than thirty years. He has taught at Allegheny College, the U.S. Military History Institute at Carlisle Barracks, and the U.S. Army War College, where he was the first Professor of Military History. He is the author or editor of five books, including "Frederick the Great on the Art of War, " and has contributed to or co-authored a dozen more. "Napoleon on the Art of War" is the culmination of three decades of work.

Harold W. Nelson, a retired brigadier general, is a former U.S. Army Chief of Military History. Luvaas and Nelson have also coedited series guides to the battles of Antietam, Gettysburg, and Chancellorsville and Fredericksburg.

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