Knowledge, Science, and Values: A Program for Scientific Philosophy

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Rodopi, 2000 - Science - 285 pages
From the contents: Some ancient problems in modern form. - On the humanities. - On the method of analytic description. - On the problem of induction. - On discussion and discussing. - On happiness. - How to understand the meaning of life'. - How to construct the logic of goods? - The meaning and the value of life. - Conflicts in ethics. - What are values? - Three attitudes towards the world. - On two views of the world. - A few remarks on rationalism and empiricism. - Identity and the individual in its persistence. - Sensory cognition and reality. - Philosophy at the crossroads."
 

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Contents

Leon Gumariski Introduction
8
Some Ancient Problems in Modern Form
17
On the Humanities
28
On the Method of Analytic Description
42
On the Problem of Induction
52
On Discussion and Discussing
60
On Logical Culture
68
On Hypotheses
76
Scientific Description
150
On Happiness
159
How to Construct the Logic of Goods
171
Conflicts in Ethics
181
What are Values?
187
Three Attitudes towards the World
197
On Two Views of the World
203
A Few Remarks on Rationalism and Empiricism
211

On the Classification of Sentences and Prepositional Functions
87
On Traditional Distinctions between Definitions
96
Deictic Definitions
103
Induction and Reasoning by Analogy
110
The Classification of Reasonings and its Consequences in the Theory
119
On the socalled Direct Justification and Selfevidence
134
On the Unity of Science
141
Identity and the Individual in Its Persistence
218
Senson Cognition and Reality
226
Philosophy at the Crossroads
241
On Individuals and Existence
248
Jacek Juliitsz Jadacki Trouble with Ontic Categories or Some Remarks
255
Mincer The Bibliography of Tadeusz Czezowski
269
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Page 22 - Now where is that process of reasoning which, from one instance, draws a conclusion, so different from that which it infers from a hundred instances that are nowise different from that single one? This question I propose as much for the sake of information, as with an intention of raising difficulties. I cannot find, I cannot imagine any such reasoning.

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