English Grammar: The English Language in Its Elements and Forms. With a History of Its Origin and Development. Designed for Use in Colleges and Schools

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Harper & Brothers, 1855 - English language - 754 pages
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Contents

Section
67
Language before the coming
84
Influence of the Norman Con
90
CHAPTER V
109
CHAPTER VI
130
Pronounceable Combina
132
Historical Analysis
138
Surds and Sonants
144
Classification of Element
151
tions
156
CHAPTER IV
165
CHAPTER VI
173
CHAPTER VIII
189
PART III
199
DEFECTS OF THE ENGLISH ALPHABET
214
CHAPTER V
222
Etymological Facts
229
Beckers Classification 340
241
Section Page 247 English Gender Philoso phic
247
Grounds for a choice of Gender in Personification
248
Numbers of Nouns
249
Double Forms of the Plural
251
Additional Statements
252
Comparative Etymology
254
Cases of Nouns
255
The Declension of English Nouns
256
Number of Cases
257
Import of the Genitive
258
Comparative Etymology
259
Difference between Ancient and Modern Languages
260
CHAPTER III
263
Other Classifications
264
Derivation of Adjectives
265
Comparison of Adjectives
266
Irregular Comparison
267
Defective Comparison
268
Comparison by Intensive Words
269
Adjectives not admitting Comparison
270
Comparative Etymology
271
Classification
272
Compound Numerals
273
CHAPTER IV
275
The Article the
276
CHAPTER V
278
Extent of Pronouns
279
Personal Pronouns
280
Declension of Personal Pro nouns
281
Pronouns of the first Person
282
Substitution of Plurality for Unity
283
Pronouns of the second Per son
284
Pronouns of the third Per son
285
The German Usage
286
Section Page
287
CHAPTER VI
304
Section
311
Section Page
359
Origin of certain Preposi
370
Common Classification
376
CHAPTER XI
384
399
399
Natural Development of
419

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