Initials and Pseudonyms: A Dictionary of Literary Disguises

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T.Y. Crowell & Company, 1885 - Anonyms and pseudonyms, American - 324 pages
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Page 9 - Lights on the Way : Some Tales within a Tale. By the late JH ALEXANDER, BA Edited by HA PAGE. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, 6s.
Page 217 - How we Spent the Summer; or, a Voyage en Zigzag in Switzerland and Tyrol with some Members of the ALPINE CLUB.
Page 12 - REAL LIFE IN LONDON : or, the Rambles and Adventures of Bob Tallyho, Esq., and his Cousin, The Hon. Tom Dashall. By an Amateur (Pierce Egan). With 31 Coloured Plates by Alken and Rowlandson, etc.
Page 219 - Revelation; or, the salvation of all men the grand thing aimed at in the scheme of God, as opened in the New Testament •writings and entrusted with Jesus Christ to bring into effect.
Page 308 - Taken from his own mouth, in his passage to England, from off Cape Horn in America, in the ship Hector.
Page 317 - The commissioners appointed under the fifth article of the treaty of amity, commerce and navigation between the United States and Great Britain, to ascertain the river which was truly intended under the name of the river St.
Page 199 - The Castle of Otranto, a Story, translated by William Marshal, Gent, from the original Italian of Onuphrio Muralto, Canon of the Church of St. Nicholas at Otranto.
Page 167 - The Claims of Thomas Jefferson to the Presidency Examined at the Bar of Christianity.
Page 33 - Christian names positively masculine, while we did not like to declare ourselves women, because - without at that time suspecting that our mode of writing and thinking was not what is called 'feminine' - we had a vague impression that authoresses are liable to be looked on with prejudice; we had noticed how critics sometimes use for their chastisement the weapon of personality, and for their reward, a flattery, which is not true praise.
Page 331 - I will hazard the assertion, that no man ever did, or ever will, become truly eloquent, without being a constant reader of the Bible, and an admirer of the purity and sublimity of its language.

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