Linguistics and the Formal Sciences: The Origins of Generative Grammar

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Feb 16, 2006 - Language Arts & Disciplines
0 Reviews
The formal sciences, particularly mathematics, have had a profound influence on the development of linguistics. This insightful overview looks at techniques that were introduced in the fields of mathematics, logic and philosophy during the twentieth century, and explores their effect on the work of various linguists. In particular, it discusses the 'foundations crisis' that destabilised mathematics at the start of the twentieth century, the numerous related movements which sought to respond to this crisis, and how they influenced the development of syntactic theory in the 1950s. The book concludes by discussing the resulting major consequences for syntactic theory, and provides a detailed reassessment of Chomsky's early work at the advent of Generative Grammar. Informative and revealing, this book will be invaluable to all those working in formal linguistics, in particular those interested in its history and development.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

0521854814c01_p120
1
0521854814c02_p2153
21
0521854814c03_p54107
54
0521854814c04_p108139
108
0521854814c05_p140182
140
0521854814c06_p183200
183
0521854814not_p201208
201
0521854814bib_p209219
209
0521854814ind_p220233
220
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xii - Chomsky's book on syntactic structures is one of the first serious attempts on the part of a linguist to construct within the tradition of scientific theory-construction a comprehensive theory of language which may be understood in the same sense that a chemical, biological theory is ordinarily understood by experts in those fields.

References to this book

About the author (2006)

Marcus Tomalin is a Fellow of Downing College, University of Cambridge, and a Research Associate in the Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge.

Bibliographic information