The politics of Aristotle: books I-V : a revised text

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Macmillan, 1894 - Music, Greek and Roman - 689 pages
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Page 621 - to the Dorian mood | Of flutes and soft recorders ; such as raised | To highth of noblest temper heroes old | Arming to battle, and instead of rage | Deliberate valour breathed, firm and unmoved | With dread of death to flight or foul retreat; | Nor wanting power to mitigate and swage, | With solemn touches, troubled thoughts, and chase Anguish and doubt and fear and sorrow and pain.
Page 677 - passages well imitated. Nor is Nature herself wanting in her own efforts to make good his assertion, for so, in physick, things of melancholick hue and quality are used against melancholy, sour against sour, salt to remove salt humours.
Page 677 - an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude, by means of language embellished with each of the different kinds of
Page 573 - Those who marry at an advanced age will probably escape the encroachments of their children; but, in diminution of this advantage, they will be likely to leave them, ignorant and helpless, to a guardian's mercy.
Page 672 - The affection both of the Bacchantes and of the children is an emotion of fear which springs out of an evil habit of the soul. And when some one applies external agitation to affections of this sort, the motion coming from without gets the better of the terrible and violent
Page 677 - to purge the mind of these and such-like passions; that is, to temper or reduce them to just measure with a kind of delight stirred up by reading or seeing those passages well imitated. Nor is Nature herself wanting in her own efforts to make good his assertion, for so, in physick, things of melancholick hue and quality are used against melancholy, sour against sour, salt to remove salt humours.
Page 243 - 75, e quanta gente più lassù s' intende, | più v' è da bene amare, e più vi s' ama, | e come specchio, 1' uno ali
Page 354 - ex quaestura in iudices, potentissimum ordinem, referebatur, iam pro futuris mox opibus ánimos gerebat. enimvero indignum id ratus Hannibal viatorem ad prendendum quaestorem misit subductumque in contionem non ipsum magis quam ordinem iudicum, prae quorum superbia atque opibus nee leges quicquam
Page 243 - che per quanto si dice più lì nostro, | tanto possiede più di ben ciascuno, | e più di caritade arde in quel chiostro;
Page 671 - the purgations and purifications which doctors and diviners use, and their fumigations with drugs magical or medicinal, as well as their washings and lustral sprinklings, have all one and the same object, which is to make a man pure both in body and soul

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