The most striking events of a twelvemonth's campaign with Zumalacarregui, in Navarre and the Basque provinces

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 262 - If your father and brother had been taken," said the general, " your treason would have been no palliation of their loyalty." The schoolmaster, I remember, held a paper cigar between his fingers (for at all times and seasons the Spaniards smoke), and was looking round for a light. The general took his own cigar from his mouth, and handed it to him to ignite hit by ; he bowed respectfully as he returned it to him. " Think on what I have said, general," cried he, as they were led away.
Page 69 - ... or fur jacket, which he always wore, he appeared rather short than otherwise. His profile had something of the antique — the lower part of the face being formed like that of Napoleon, and the whole cast of his features bearing some resemblance to the ancient basso-relievos, which are given us as the likeness of Hannibal.
Page 70 - He had always been serious, but without those sudden gusts of passion to which he was latterly subject ; and also without that unbending severity of demeanour, which became afterwards a striking feature of his character. Those who have undergone the painful experience of a civil war, like that which for two years has desolated the north of Spain...
Page 69 - ... profile had something of the antique — the lower part of the face being formed like that of Napoleon, and the whole cast of his features bearing some resemblance to the ancient basso-relievos, which are given us as the likeness of Hannibal. His hair was dark, without being black ; his moustaches joined his whiskers ; and his dark grey eyes, overshadowed by strong eyebrows, had a singular rapidity and intensity in their gaze — generally they had a stern and thoughtful expression ; but when...
Page 161 - This has given rise to a report that he never sleeps above a few minutes in the fourand-twenty hours, — a story in which the Castilians place implicit faith, and indeed they may well believe anything of a countryman who neither smokes nor drinks wine. He is simple and even patriarchal in all his habits, but the successes he has obtained have always been tarnished with cruelty. An indefatigable and faithful adherent to the cause he has adopted, he has ever been found a bitter and merciless enemy;...
Page 227 - ... —and the wretched man was led out, and, after being half an hour with his confessor, shot ; as well as his brother and the other officers. His execution took place on the very field where he had been defeated ; his fortune and his life both taking wing on the same spot. Poor O'Doyle's was a melancholy fate, but it is impossible to deny the singular retribution of his punishment.
Page 160 - He always carries, slung by his side, an enormous blunderbuss or trombone, the discharge of which, loaded with a handful of powder and a number of slugs, is like that of a piece of artillery, and would fracture his shoulder if fired in the ordinary manner ; but he places the stock under his arm, and holds the barrel tight with the other hand. The last effort the Christinos made to take him was by sending- against him a colonel named Moyos, who had also been a chief of partisans, much in Merino's...
Page 259 - ... with considerable difficulty, they were got down over the roof of the church, which, although the steeple was burning for ten or twelve hours, had never taken fire. The commandant and his lieutenant were brought before the general, who inquired whether the garrison had been acting all along by their orders. The commandant hesitated, but the ex-schoolmaster boldly replied, " Yes; they acted by our orders." The former was a short man, about four-and-thirty, his form athletic, and his bones all...
Page 71 - It was seldom that he gave way to anything like mirth; he oftenest indulged in a smile when he led his staff where the shot were falling thick and fast around them, and he fancied he detected in the countenances of some of his followers that they thought the whistling of the bullets an unpleasant tune. To him fear seemed a thing unknown ; and although, in the commencement, a bold and daring conduct was necessary to gain the affections and confidence of rude partisans, he outstripped the bounds of...
Page 225 - ... Zumalacarregui to know how to proceed. The Carlist general determined to blockade them next day; as they were entirely without provisions, he knew that hunger would force them to surrender. Eighty-four prisoners were brought in, which the soldiers had made when tired of killing ; for excepting cepting in these few cases no quarter was given ; even two chaplains of the queen's army had been slain on the field. It was supposed that, according to the existing regulation, they would all suffer death;...

Bibliographic information