Immigrant Health and the Community

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Harper & brothers, 1921 - Aliens - 481 pages
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Page ix - THIS volume is the result of studies in methods of Americanization prepared through funds furnished by the Carnegie Corporation of New York. It arose out of the fact that constant applications were being made to the Corporation for contributions to the work of numerous agencies engaged in various forms of social activity intended to extend among the people of the United States the knowledge of their government and their obligations to it. The trustees felt that a study which should set forth, not...
Page 84 - ... months old. The babies were grouped also according to the kind of house in which the family lived. The death rate for babies whose homes were in one-family houses was 86.1 per 1,000; in houses containing seven or more families 236.6 per 1,000. Similarly the rate showed a steady increase according to the number of persons per room. It was 123.3 per 1,000 where the family had more rooms than persons; and 245.9 where there were two or more persons per room.
Page 442 - But I am aware that I have not yet considered the main problem of the consequence of race intermixture, considering races as differing by a number of characters. First, I have to say that this subject has not been sufficiently investigated; but we may, by inference from studies that have been made, draw certain conclusions. Any well-established abundant race is probably well adjusted to its conditions and its parts and functions are harmoniously adjusted. Take the case of the Leghorn hen. Its function...
Page vii - Americanization is the uniting of new with native-born Americans in fuller common understanding and appreciation to secure by means of self-government the highest welfare of all. Such Americanization should perpetuate no unchangeable political, domestic, and economic regime delivered once for all to the fathers, but a growing and broadening national life, inclusive of the best wherever found. With all our rich heritages, Americanism will develop best through a mutual giving and taking of contributions...
Page 202 - Shops of the Association for the Improvement of the Condition of the Poor in New York City...
Page 439 - ... a conviction that, as all races have contributed in the past to cultural progress in one way or another, so they will be capable of advancing the interests of mankind if we are only willing to give them a fair opportunity.
Page 72 - I know that the idea prevalent among Americans is that the alien imports his slums with him to the detriment of his adopted country, that the squalor and the misery and the filth of the foreign quarters in the large cities of the United States are characteristic of the native life of the peoples who live in those quarters. But that is an error and a slander. The slums are emphatically not of our making. So far is the immigrant from being accustomed to such living conditions that the first thing that...
Page 443 - ... 10" is an inch of danger; children of insufficient circulation. On the other hand, there may appear children of short stature with too large circulatory apparatus. Despite the great capacity that the body has for self adjustment it fails to overcome the bad hereditary combinations. Again it seems probable, as dentists with whom I have spoken on the subject agree, that many cases of overcrowding or wide separation of teeth are due to a lack of harmony between size of jaw and size of teeth —...
Page 301 - Tuberculosis and the Committee on the Prevention of Tuberculosis of the Charity Organization Society of The City of New York, at the Museum of Natural History, from November 27 to December 9, 1905.

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