The Way of the Bodhisattva

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Shambhala Publications, Nov 6, 2007 - Religion - 64 pages
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Treasured by Buddhists of all traditions, The Way of the Bodhisattva (Bodhicharyavatara) is a guide to cultivating the mind of enlightenment, and to generating the qualities of love, compassion, generosity, and patience. This text has been studied, practiced, and expounded upon in an unbroken tradition for centuries, first in India, and later in Tibet. Presented in the form of a personal meditation in verse, it outlines the path of the Bodhisattvas—those who renounce the peace of individual enlightenment and vow to work for the liberation of all beings and to attain buddhahood for their sake.

This version, translated from the Tibetan, is a revision by the translators of the 1997 edition. Included are a foreword by His Holiness the Dalai Lama, a new translator's preface, a thorough introduction, a note on the translation, and three appendices of commentary by the Nyingma master Kunzang Pelden.
 

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Shantideva's presentation of these teachings is poetic and penetrating. He makes it all sound so very reasonable. It is a delicious way to turn your mind toward your heart's truest desire.

Contents

Introduction
1
The Text and the Translation
25
The Excellence of Bodhichitta
31
Confession
37
Taking Hold of Bodhichitta
47
Carefulness
53
Vigilant Introspection
61
Patience
77
Wisdom
137
Dedication
163
appendixes
173
The Life of Shantideva
175
Equalizing Self and Other
182
Exchanging Self and Other
189
Notes
195
Bibliography
215

Diligence
97
Meditative Concentration
109

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About the author (2007)

Shantideva was a scholar in the eighth century from the monastic university Nalanda, one of the most celebrated centers of learning in ancient India. According to legend, Shantideva was greatly inspired by the celestial bodhisattva Manjushri, from whom he secretly received teachings and great insights. Yet as far as the other monks could tell, there was nothing special about Shantideva. In fact, he seemed to do nothing but eat and sleep. In an attempt to embarrass him, the monks forced Shantideva's hand by convincing him to publicly expound on the scriptures. To the amazement of all in attendance that day, Shantideva delivered the original and moving verses of the Bodhicharyavatara. When he reached verse thirty-four of the ninth chapter, he began to rise into the sky, until he at last disappeared. Following this, Shantideva became a great teacher.

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