The End of the Pacific War: Reappraisals

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Stanford University Press, 2007 - History - 331 pages
This book offers state-of-the-art reinterpretations of the reasons for Japan's decision to surrender: Which was the critical factor, the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, or the Soviet Union's entry into the war? Writing from the perspective of three different nationalities and drawing on newly available documents from Japan, the United States, and the former Soviet Union, five distinguished historians review the evidence and the arguments--and agree to disagree. The contributors are Barton J. Bernstein, Richard Frank, Sumio Hatano, Tsuyoshi Hasegawa, and David Holloway.

 

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Contents

Japanese Political and Military Strategy in 1945
65
Which
113
From
189
The Interpretive Dialogue 19892005
228
Notes
243
Bibliographical Note
299
Index
321
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Tsuyoshi Hasegawa is Professor of Modern Russian and Soviet History at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His publications include The Northern Territories Dispute and Russo-Japanese Relations, vol. 1: Between War and Peace, 1967-1985; vol. 2: Neither War Nor Peace, 1985-1998(1998); and Racing the Enemy: Stalin, Truman, and the Surrender of Japan (2005).

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