Charles Bianconi: A Biography, 1786-1875

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Chapman and Hall, 1878 - 327 pages
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Page 80 - ... pence and four pence, thus enabling that portion of the population who could previously badly afford only one shirt each to have two for a less price than was paid for one, and in the same ratio other commodities came into general use at reduced prices.
Page 74 - Up to the year 1815, the public accommodation for the conveyance of passengers in Ireland was confined to a few mail and day coaches on the great lines of road. From my peculiar position in the country, I had ample opportunities of reflecting on many things, and nothing struck me more forcibly than the great vacuum that existed in travelling accommodation between the different orders of society. The inconvenience felt for the want of a more extended means of intercourse, particularly from the interior...
Page 76 - ... and spent three days in making his market, can now do so in one for a few shillings, thereby saving two clear days, and the expense and use of his horse. The example of this institution has been generally followed, and cars innumerable leave the interior for the principal towns in the south of Ireland, which bring parties to and from markets at an enormous saving of time, and in many instances cheaper than they could walk it. This establishment has now been in existence twenty-eight years, travelling...
Page 92 - My conveyances, many of them carrying very important mails, have been travelling during all hours of the day and night, often in lonely and unfrequented places ; and during the long period of forty-two years that my establishment has been in existence, the slightest injury has never been done by the people to my property, or that entrusted to my care...
Page 77 - ... grasp. For my part, I cannot better compare it than to a man emerging into convalescence from a serious attack of malignant fever, and requiring generous and nutritive diet in place of medical treatment. Thus I act with my drivers, who are taken from the lowest grade of the establishment, and who are progressively advanced according to their respective merits, as opportunity offers...
Page 76 - ... to 4000 tons of hay, and from 30,000 to 40,000 barrels of oats annually ; all of which are purchased in their respective localities. These vehicles do not travel on Sundays, unless such portions of them as are in connection with the post-office or canals, for the following reasons : — First, the Irish, being a religious people, will not travel on business on Sundays ; and secondly, experience teaches me, that I can work a horse eight miles per day, for six days in the week, much better than...
Page 80 - ... of carrying eight; and in proportion as the breed of horses improved, I continued to increase the size of the cars for summer work, and to add to the number of horses in winter for the conveyance of the same number of passengers, until I converted the two-wheeled two-horse cars into four-wheeled cars, drawn by two, three or four horses, according to the traffic on the respective roads and the wants of the public.
Page 76 - The advantages derived by the country from this establishment are almost incalculable ; for instance, the farmer who formerly rode and spent three days in making his market, can now do so in one for a few shillings, thereby saving two clear days, and the expense and use of his horse. The example of this institution has been generally followed, and cars innumerable leave the interior for the principal towns in the south of Ireland, which bring parties to and from markets at an enormous saving of time,...
Page 75 - ... gave great advantage to a few at the expense of the many, and above all, occasioned a great loss of time ; for instance, a farmer living twenty or thirty miles from his market town, spent the day in riding to it, a second day doing his business, and a third day returning. In July 1815...
Page 76 - ... never met any interruption in the performance of its arduous duties. Much surprise has often been expressed at the high order of men connected with it, and at its popularity ; but parties thus expressing themselves forget to look at Irish society with sufficient grasp. For my part, I cannot better compare it than to a man...

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