Western India in 1838, Volume 1

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Saunders and Otley, 1839 - Bombay (Presidency)
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Page 196 - Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil : for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff comfort me.
Page 110 - Behold, I stand here by the well of water ; and the daughters of the men of the city come out to draw water: and let it come to pass, that the damsel to whom I shall say, Let down thy pitcher, I pray thee, that I may drink...
Page 182 - Into the thickest wood; there soon they chose The fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renowned, But such as at this day to Indians known In Malabar or Deccan spreads her arms, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillared shade High overarched, and echoing walks between;27 There oft the Indian herdsman shunning heat Shelters in cool, and tends his pasturing herds At loopholes cut through thickest shade.
Page 1 - Came freshening, and reflecting all the scene : (A mirror in the depth of flowery shelves ;) So sweet a spot of earth you might, (I ween) Have guessed some congregation of the elves To sport by summer moons, had shaped it for themselves...
Page 72 - Zidon: for the sea hath spoken, even the strength of the sea, saying, I travail not, nor bring forth children, neither do I nourish up young men, nor bring up virgins.
Page 35 - Hotel solicits the patronage of travellers ; but, as it is situated in the very dirtiest and very narrowest street of the fort, the additional annoyances of flights of mosquitoes, a billiard table, a coffee and a tap room, place it without the pale of respectable support. The Sanitarium affords shelter to invalids, and is delightfully situated, where the smooth sands and fine sea-breeze render it a tempting locality for the convalescent ; but the rooms are far too small for family accommodation....
Page 166 - cook boy", who relieves them from the toil of domestic duties, the only resource of the soldiers' wives is in mischievous associations, discontented murmurings, and habits of dissipated indulgence. Strolling in the evenings through the dirty bazaars of a native town, probably under the auspices of an ayah who may have picked up a smattering of the English language, these unhappy women purchase liquor, to conciliate their careless husbands. On returning late to the barracks, the truant wife frequently...
Page 13 - During the hot season, the (Bombay) Esplanade is adorned with pretty, cool, temporary residences, erected near the sea; their chuppered roofs and rustic porches half concealed by the flowering creepers and luxuriant shrubs, which shade them from the mid-day glare. These bungalows are situated in line, with spaces between each, at a convenient distance from the road; the material of which they are made is simply bamboo and plaster, lined with strained dungaree, dyed a pale straw colour; the offices...
Page 224 - Shortly after coming to Agra I passed the Jumna with this object in view, and examined the country to pitch upon a fit spot for a garden. The whole was so ugly and detestable that I repassed the river quite repulsed and disgusted. In consequence...
Page 165 - In remarking on the irregularities and vices of soldiers' wives in India, it is only just to notice the temptations, restraints, and miseries, to which this class of women are subject, in a country so little calculated to cherish their better feelings, or to provide them with necessary occupation, or common comfort. Unable, from extreme heat, to move out of the little room allotted to them in the "married men's quarters," during the day, and provided, for two rupees a month, with a Portuguese "cook...

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