Proceedings of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

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s.n., 1899 - Science
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Page 137 - I now mean by elements, as those chymists that speak plainest do by their principles, certain primitive and simple, or perfectly unmingled bodies; which not being made of any other bodies, or of one another, are the ingredients of which all those called perfectly mixt bodies are immediately compounded, and into which they are ultimately resolved...
Page 211 - ONTARIO AND KEEWATIN (HUDSON BAY). While Logan was exploring the Gaspe sandstones, in 1843, Mr. A. Murray, then assistant geologist to the Canadian survey, was engaged in a "geological examination of the district lying in a general line between Georgian bay, on lake Huron, and the lower extremity of lake Erie." In his report on that year's operations, published in 1845, Mr. Murray correctly, and for the first time, regards the rocks at Port Colborne, Cayuga, etc., which he calls the upper limestones,...
Page 145 - It is conceivable that the various kinds of matter, now recognized as different elementary substances, may possess one and the same ultimate or atomic molecule existing in different conditions of movement.
Page 457 - Ever since boyhood it had been his cherished hope to work some day side by side with his brother Henry. Such an opportunity now presented itself. The younger man had settled in Boston some years previous, and released from the duties of his collegiate work, William B. Rogers gladly sought the congenial atmosphere of the northern city where it was possible to devote himself to original work. He associated himself with the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Boston Society of Natural History,...
Page 238 - It is, therefore, of the highest importance to gain a clear insight into the means of modification and coadaptation. At the commencement of my observations it seemed to me probable that a careful study of domesticated animals and of cultivated plants would offer the best chance of making out this obscure problem. Nor have I been disappointed ; in this and in all other perplexing cases I have invariably found that our knowledge, imperfect though it be, of variation under domestication, afforded the...
Page 34 - Reason," which appeared to justify the expectation that it should be possible to construct a priori a science of time as well as a science of space.
Page 463 - Congress the power to make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution' "' "all powers vested by this Constitution in the Government of the United States or in any department or officer thereof.
Page 423 - He widened knowledge and escaped the praise; He wisely taught, because more wise to learn; He toiled for Science, not to draw men's gaze, But for her lore of self-denial stern. That such a man could spring from our decays Fans the soul's nobler faith until it burn.
Page 419 - ... vice-president for the next meeting, in Montreal. But the death of the President elect, Professor JW Bailey of West Point, called Dr. Caswell to the chair. At this large representation of the science of the Continent (the only meeting which has taken place outside of the limits of the United States), he sustained the credit of his country on a foreign soil, by his dignified presence and his manly eloquence, to the great satisfaction of all his associates. At such a time and in such a position,...
Page 404 - He divided the whole coast line into sections, and organized, under separate parties, the essential operations of the survey simultaneously in each. He commenced the exploration of the Gulf Stream, and at the same time projected a series of observations on the tides, on the magnetism of the earth, and the direction of the winds at different seasons of the year. He also instituted a succession of researches in regard to the bottom of the ocean within soundings, and the forms of animal life which are...

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