A Study in Socialism

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B. Herder, 1915 - Socialism - 328 pages
 

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Page 146 - Therefore I must say that, as I hope for mercy, I can have no other notion of all the other governments that I see or know, than that they are a conspiracy of the rich, who on pretence of managing the public only pursue their private ends...
Page 163 - Workers of the world, unite. You have nothing to lose but your chains.
Page 96 - State interference in social relations becomes, in one domain after another, superfluous, and then dies out of itself ; the government of persons is replaced by the administration of things, and by the conduct of processes of production. The State is not 'abolished.
Page 123 - Such measures of relief as we may be able to force from capitalism are but a preparation of the workers to seize the whole powers of government, in order that they may thereby lay hold of the whole system of socialized industry and thus come to their rightful inheritance.
Page 124 - By bourgeoisie is meant the class of modern Capitalists, owners of the means of social production and employers of wage-labor. By proletariat, the class of modern wagelaborers who, having no means of production of their own, are reduced to selling their labor-power in order to live.
Page 32 - With me, on the contrary, the ideal is nothing else than the material world reflected by the human mind, and translated into forms of thought...
Page 146 - ... so necessary, that no commonwealth could hold out a year without them, can only earn so poor a livelihood, and must lead so miserable a life, that the condition of the beasts is much better than theirs...
Page 65 - Whether there is anywhere now, or will ever be, this communion of women and children and of property, in which the private and individual is altogether banished from life, and things which are by nature private, such as eyes and ears and hands, have become common, and...
Page 124 - The bourgeoisie has stripped of its halo every occupation hitherto honored and looked up to with reverent awe. It has converted the physician, the lawyer, the priest, the poet, the man of science, into its paid wage-laborers.
Page 92 - The right to rule is not necessarily, however, bound up with any special mode of government. It may take this or that form, provided only that it be of a nature to insure the general...

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