The Dramatick Works of Mr. George Farquhar ...: The recruiting officer, Sir Harry Wildair. The inconstant. The twin rivals

Front Cover
B. Lintot, 1736
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 17 - Suppose we lampooned all the pretty women in town, and left her out? Or what if we made a ball, and forgot to invite her with one or two of the ugliest.
Page 26 - I shall drop down with shame. Mir. And so, Madam, not doubting but your Ladyship may like him as well as he does you, I think it proper to leave you together.
Page 14 - Why, sir, you've cast your skin, sure; you're brisk and gay — lusty health about you — no sign of age, but your silver hairs. Old Mir. Silver hairs ! Then they are quicksilver hairs, sir. Whilst I have golden pockets, let my hairs be silver, an' they will. Adsbud, sir, I can dance, and sing, and drink, and — no, I can't wench. But, Mr Dugard, no news of my son Bob in all your travels ? Dug.
Page 59 - French marquis for a thousand pound ; that very picture did your very virtuous wife send to the marquis as a pledge of her very virtuous and dying affection. So that you are both robb'd of your honour and cheated of your money.
Page 76 - He means marriage, I think — but that you know is so odd a thing, that hardly any two people under the sun agree in the ceremony ; some make it a sacrament, others a convenience, and others make it a jest ; but among soldiers 'tis most sacred — our sword you know is our honour, that we lay down — the Hero jumps over it first, and the Amazon after — Leap, rogue, follow, whore — the drum beats a ruff, and so...
Page 64 - My lady begins to be penitent, and, if you make any noise, 'twill spoil all. Stand. Look'e, gentlemen, I have too great a confidence in the virtue of my wife, to think it in the power of you, or you, sir, to wrong my honour. But I am bound to guard her reputation, so that no attempts be made that may provoke a scandal. Therefore, gentlemen, let me tell you it is time to desist.
Page 69 - Come, show me this devil. Kite. He's a little busy at present ; but when he has done, he shall wait on you. Mel. What is he doing ? Kite. Writing your name in his pocket-book. Mel. Ha, ha ! my name ! Pray, what have you or he to do with my name? Kite.
Page 33 - I place you both sentinels in this place for two hours : to watch the motion of St Mary's clock, you ; and you the motion of St Chad's. And he that dares stir from his post till he be relieved, shall have my sword in his guts the next minute.
Page 13 - Nay, for that matter, I'll spend my penny with the best he that wears a head, that is, begging your pardon, sir, and in a fair way. KITE Give me your hand then; and now, gentlemen, I have no more to say but this - here's a purse of gold, and there is a tub of humming ale at my quarters; 'tis the Queen's money and the Queen's drink.
Page 31 - O Sir, I shall match ye : a good husband makes a good wife at any time. Mir. I'll rattle down your china about your ears. Ori. And I'll rattle about the city to run you in debt for more. Mir.

Bibliographic information