Tales Told in Holland

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Olive Beaupré Miller
Kessinger Publishing, Jan 1, 2005 - Social Science - 192 pages
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1926. Tales Told in Holland consists chiefly of stories with a few translations from the greatest Dutch poets and a few old Dutch nursery rhymes, naive and nonsensical as our English rhymes, and contrasting interestingly with the far more sophisticated rhymes of the French. There is at least one story from each of the eleven Dutch Provinces, which form the kingdom of the Netherlands. In addition to these folk tales, there are tales of the great Dutch artists, that wonderful group whom even Italy could scarcely excel, and stories with a background introducing all the high spots in Dutch history, from the time when the Netherlands formed a part of the Empire of Charlemagne through her most dramatic days of struggle for independence from Spain and down to the Peace Palace of today. Thus this book comes to reveal in a way most interesting to the child, as much as possible of all sides of Dutch life; its history, art, literature, geography, and customs as well as the Dutchman's sense of humor, his love of cleanliness and thrift, his sturdy independence and the character of his fancies.

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About the author (2005)

Maud Fuller Petersham was born in Kingston, New York on August 5, 1889. She graduated from Vassar College in 1912 and later studied at the New York School of Fine and Applied Art. She worked at the International Art Service, where she met her future husband and life-long illustrating partner, Miska Petersham. The husband-and-wife team illustrated more than 70 books for children, many of which they also wrote. They received the 1946 Caldecott Medal for The Rooster Crows: A Book of American Rhymes and Jingles. Their other works include The Rootabaga Stories by Carl Sandburg, The Box with Red Wheels, and The Christ Child. She died in 1971.

Miska Petersham was born in Torokszentmiklos, Hungary on September 20, 1888. He graduated from the Budapest Academy of Art in Hungary and immigrated to the United States in 1912. He worked at the International Art Service, where he met his future wife and life-long illustrating partner, Maud Petersham. The husband-and-wife team illustrated more than 70 books for children, many of which they also wrote. They received the 1946 Caldecott Medal for The Rooster Crows: A Book of American Rhymes and Jingles. Their other works include The Rootabaga Stories by Carl Sandburg, The Box with Red Wheels, and The Christ Child. He died in 1960.

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