Robinson Crusoe

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Macmillan and Company, 1868 - Castaways - 607 pages
 

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ITS MY MOST FAVOURITE BOOK "ROBINSON CRUSOE",
THE BOOK GIVES A CLEAR IDEA ABOUT THE NECESSITY OF SELF RELIANCY AND THE ADVENTURES IN OUR LIFE .THE NOVEL IS A CLEAR VISION OF OUR DEPENDENCE ON
OTHERS . IT GIVES MOTIVATION AND INSPIRATION TO THE CYBER WORLD TO EXPLORE THE WORLD OUT OF THE TEXTBOOKS AND TO LEARN FROM THE NATURE. IT ENRICHES ONE WITH DETERMINATION AND SELF CONFIDENCE .ONE COULD ATTAIN ALL THE QUALITIES TO LIVE AND SURVIVE FROM THIS BOOK . IT GIVES POWER AND HOPE EVEN TO THE DESPERATES.
AS ALL I TOO LIKED ROBINSON CRUSOE AND LOVE HIM FOR HIS GALLANCY AND BRAVERY. THE NEXT NOTABLE CHARACTER HERE IS FRIDAY WHO CAME TO THE NOVEL ON A FRIDAY .ROBINSON CRUSOE IS THE BEST BOOK I HAVE EVER READ.EVEN HE WAS ALONE AND ALL ALONE IN THE ISLAND HE IS FILLED WITH PRAYER,HOPE AND TRUST IN GOD.
 

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Alliyah Underwood
9-9-2014
8th Period
Robinson Crusoe
By: Daniel Defoe
Robinson Crusoe was about 18 years old. He and his family settled in Hull, England. Crusoe’s father desired for him to become a lawyer. Instead, Crusoe craved to voyage the seas. His father informed him that being middle class is more stable. Robinson Crusoe leaves with a friend anyway, after his parents wouldn’t allow him to take at least one voyage. Crusoe and his friend are forced to land on the way to London because of ridged weather. When his friend apprehends that Crusoe ran away, they split up. Crusoe then decides to go to London by land. He wants to go home but, he doesn’t want to be degraded by his parents. He found an additional voyage to Guinea, where he becomes a trader. While sailing the voyage the ship is besieged by Turkish pirates. The pirates kidnap the passengers and take them to the port of Sallee. Crusoe is then made a victim of tyranny. He plotted to flee for at least two years. He was sent to go fishing with two of the pirates to go fishing. He throws one of them overboard the ship and allows the other, Xury, to live if he is faithful. They land on a seemingly abandoned island. They meet friendly settlers there. They also saw a Portuguese ship and accomplished getting the attention of the captain. He willingly takes them to Brazil for free. Crusoe left Xury with the captain and goes to Brazil. His financial advisors were a captain and widow in England. Robinson buys a plantation and gains partners’ overtime. He is doing well financially. He takes up a recommendation to trade slaves. The men wish for Crusoe to be tradepost master. He goes on the voyage, the ship wrecks and he is the only survivor on an island. He stayed on the island for 27 years. He built his whole life up, including religion to keep from becoming miserable on the island. After 15 years he finds out that cannibals visit the island periodically. The next time they came he scared them off with a gun and saved a barbarian. He named him Friday and he became his grateful dependent. He accomplished the English language and picked up Christian values. Another ship of barbarians land on the island and Crusoe manages to save a Spaniard and Friday’s father. After a few months they try to save the rest of the Spaniards. Before Friday’s father and the Spaniard could retreat, a boat of Europeans. Come ashore. They have three prisoners. Crusoe learns that the crew revolted. He says he will help them as long as they leave the authority to him and take him and Friday to England for free. They captured the rest of the crew and are taken to England. Crusoe finds out that his plantations had excelled and he was very wealthy. He paid the Portuguese captain and widow for being so nice. He then settled down and had three children. Once his wife died, he began voyaging again.
 

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Page 156 - I came home to my fortification, not feeling, as we say, the ground I went on, but terrified to the last degree; looking behind me at every two or three steps, mistaking every bush and tree, and fancying every stump at a distance to be a man.
Page 156 - When I came to my castle, for so I think I called it ever after this, I fled into it like one pursued. Whether I went over by the ladder, as first contrived, or went in at the hole in the rock, which I called a door, I cannot remember ; no, nor could I remember the next morning, for never frighted hare fled to cover, or fox to earth, with more terror of mind than I to this retreat.
Page 158 - ... creatures ; that to have seen one of my own species would have seemed to me a raising me from death to life, and the greatest blessing that Heaven itself, next to the supreme blessing of salvation, could bestow ; I say, that I should now tremble at the very apprehensions of seeing a man, and was ready to sink into the ground at but the shadow or silent appearance of a man's having set his foot in the island.
Page 57 - I smiled to myself at the sight of this money. "O drug!" said I aloud, "what art thou good for? Thou art not worth to me, no, not the taking off of the ground; one of those knives is worth all this heap.
Page 245 - Secondly, my people were perfectly subjected, — I was absolute lord and lawgiver; they all owed their lives to me, and were ready to lay down their lives, if there had been occasion of it, for me.
Page 157 - That as I lived quite on the other side of the island, he would never have been so simple to leave a mark in a place where it was ten thousand to one whether I should ever see it or not, and in the sand too, which the first surge of the sea upon a high wind would have defaced entirely. All this seemed inconsistent with the thing itself, and with all the notions we usually entertain of the subtlety of the devil.
Page 50 - I swam on board in them and my stockings : however, this put me upon rummaging for clothes, of which I found enough, but took no more than I wanted for present use, for I had other things which my eye was more upon...
Page xviii - he is a middle.sized, spare man, about forty years old, of a brown complexion, and dark-brown coloured hair, but wears a wig ; a hooked nose, a sharp chin, grey eyes, and a large mole near his mouth...
Page 44 - I got upon my feet, and endeavoured to make on towards the land as fast as I could, before another wave should return and take me up again ; but I soon found it was impossible to avoid it ; for I saw the sea coming after me as high as a great hill, and as furious as an enemy, which I had no means or strength to contend with...
Page 321 - ... and the men of labour spent their strength in daily strugglings for bread to maintain the vital strength they laboured with ; so living in a daily circulation of sorrow, living but to work, and working but to live, as if daily bread were the only end of wearisome life, and a wearisome life the only occasion of daily bread.

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