Robinson Crusoe

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Macmillan and Company, 1868 - 607 pages
 

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User Review  - Marinam77 - LibraryThing

This is one of my favorite classics. The story is about a man that has been stranded on a deserted island for more than 28 years. Despite loneliness and despair he finds courage and the will to live ... Read full review

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this is boring i prefer the movie

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Page 146 - I came home to my fortification, not feeling, as we say, the ground I went on, but terrified to the last degree; looking behind me at every two or three steps, mistaking every bush and tree, and fancying every stump at a distance to be a man.
Page 146 - When I came to my castle, for so I think I called it ever after this, I fled into it like one pursued. Whether I went over by the ladder, as first contrived, or went in at the hole in the rock, which I called a door, I cannot remember ; no, nor could I remember the next morning, for never frighted hare fled to cover, or fox to earth, with more terror of mind than I to this retreat.
Page 148 - ... creatures ; that to have seen one of my own species would have seemed to me a raising me from death to life, and the greatest blessing that Heaven itself, next to the supreme blessing of salvation, could bestow ; I say, that I should now tremble at the very apprehensions of seeing a man, and was ready to sink into the ground at but the shadow or silent appearance of a man's having set his foot in the island.
Page 47 - I smiled to myself at the sight of this money. "O drug!" said I aloud, "what art thou good for? Thou art not worth to me, no, not the taking off of the ground; one of those knives is worth all this heap.
Page 235 - Secondly, my people were perfectly subjected, — I was absolute lord and lawgiver; they all owed their lives to me, and were ready to lay down their lives, if there had been occasion of it, for me.
Page 147 - That as I lived quite on the other side of the island, he would never have been so simple to leave a mark in a place where it was ten thousand to one whether I should ever see it or not, and in the sand too, which the first surge of the sea upon a high wind would have defaced entirely. All this seemed inconsistent with the thing itself, and with all the notions we usually entertain of the subtlety of the devil.
Page 40 - I swam on board in them and my stockings : however, this put me upon rummaging for clothes, of which I found enough, but took no more than I wanted for present use, for I had other things which my eye was more upon...
Page viii - he is a middle.sized, spare man, about forty years old, of a brown complexion, and dark-brown coloured hair, but wears a wig ; a hooked nose, a sharp chin, grey eyes, and a large mole near his mouth...
Page 34 - I got upon my feet, and endeavoured to make on towards the land as fast as I could, before another wave should return and take me up again ; but I soon found it was impossible to avoid it ; for I saw the sea coming after me as high as a great hill, and as furious as an enemy, which I had no means or strength to contend with...
Page 311 - ... and the men of labour spent their strength in daily strugglings for bread to maintain the vital strength they laboured with ; so living in a daily circulation of sorrow, living but to work, and working but to live, as if daily bread were the only end of wearisome life, and a wearisome life the only occasion of daily bread.

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