Elements of Astronomy: Designed as a Text-book for Academies, Seminaries, and Families

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David & Woods, 1867 - Astronomy - 348 pages
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Contents

Solar Spots
25
Motions of the Sun
26
Mercury
29
Venus
33
The Earthits Annual Motion
36
Daily Motion of the Earth
38
The Moon
40
Phases of the Moon
41
Solar and Lunar Eclipses
42
Lunar Eclipses
45
Lunar Influences
46
Lunar Atmosphere
48
Lunar Surface
50
Mars
54
The Asteroids
55
Jupiter
58
Jupiters Moons
60
Saturn and his Bings
62
Saturn and his Moons
66
Uranus Herschel or Georgium Sidus
68
Satellites of Uranus
69
Neptune
70
Satellites of Neptune
71
Light and Heat on Neptune
72
The Earthone of a Class
74
Planets inhabited
76
General Configuration of the Heavenly Bodies
77
Specific Form of the Earth
79
The PlanetsOblate Spheroids
81
Position of the Solar System in Relation to the Starry Heavens
82
Motions of the Planets around the Sun
85
Centrifugal and Centripetal Forces
88
Motion of the Planets on their Axes
90
Weight of Objects on the Sun and Planets
91
Earths Atmosphere
93
Refraction
96
Twilight
99
Aurora Borealis
101
Shooting Stars
105
Meteorites Aerolites and Fireballs
108
Zodiacal Light
112
Light
115
Colors of Light
119
Refracting Telescope
123
Reflecting Telescope
125
CometsTheir Early History
127
Enckes Comet
129
Bielai Comet
132
Halleys Comet
135
The Comet of 1744
137
The Comet of 1843
140
General Form and Appearance of Comets
142
Gravity of Comots
144
Rarity of Comets
146
Nature of Comets
148
Comets shine by Reflected Light
149
Anomalous Aspect of Comets
152
Tails of CometsHow formed
155
Superstitious Notions concerning Comets
157
Distance to Fixed Stars
159
Classification of Fixed Stars
161
Stars have no Sensible Discs
164
Real Magnitude of Stars
165
Method of computing Distances to Fixed Stars by Trigonometry
167
Telescopic Method of computing Distances of Heavenly Bodies
168
UBANOGEAPHY cm
170
The Stars are SelfLuminous Bodies
172
Magellan Clouds
190
Nebulffi Proper
191
Annular Nebulfe
193
Stellar Nebula and Nebulous Stars
195
Planetary Nebulie
197
Globular Nebula or Clusters
199
LXXXVIISpiral Nebulae
201
Structure and Harmony of the Universe
204
Circles of the Sphere
207
Elements of Planets
209
Characters of Planets
210
SECTION LXXXIXThe Visible or Sensible Horizon
211
The Rational Horizon
213
XCLZenith and Nadir
214
Arrangement of the Planets and the Planes of their Orbits
215
Planes of the Orbits of Asteroids and Comets
217
The Three Great Laws discovered by Kepler
218
Orbits of the Planets
223
Characteristic Points of the Orbits
224
Equinoxes and Solstices
225
Precession of the Equinoxes
228
Nutation
229
Lunar Orbit and Eclipses
231
Method of Finding the Distance to the Moon also to the Sun and from the Sun to the Planets
234
GILMethod of Finding the Magnitude of the Moon Sun and Planets
237
GUI Seasons on the Earth
238
Seasons of the Planets
242
Divisions of Time
247
Solar Day
249
Equation of Time
252
Tropical Civil and Sidereal Year
254
The Calendar
257
Calendar Synodical and Sidereal Months
261
Tides
263
Spring Tides 287
267
Neap Tides
269
Height of the Tides
270
Parallax
273
Proper Motion of the Stars
276
NAMES AND CHAKAOTERS OF THE SIGNS OF THE ODIAC
282
SECTION CXVII Cepheus visible in November
283
Perseus and Head of Medusa visible in November
289
Aries visible in December
290
Cetus visible in December
292
Auriga visible in January
293
Taurus visible in January
295
Orion visible in January
296
OXXVII Eridanus visible in January
298
Gemini visible in February
299
Cancer visible in March
304
Argo Navis visible in March
305
Ursa Major visible in April
307
Virgo visible in May
310
Centaurus et Crux visible in May
311
IJbra visible In June
313
CXXXVI1I Bootes et Canis Venatici visible in June
314
Ursa Minor visible In June
316
Scorpio visible in July
317
Serpentarius et Serpens visible in July
319
Hercules visible in July
320
Sagittarius visible in August
322
Capricornus visible in September
323
Aquarius visible in October
326
Pegasus visible in October
328
CONSTELLATIONS OF MINOR IMPORTANCE IN BOTH HEMISPHERES
330
DEFINITIONS OF ASTRONOMICAL TERMS AND PHRASES
333

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 208 - Latitude in the Heavens, is distance north or south of the ecliptic, and at right angles with it. Longitude on the Earth, is distance either east or west from some fixed meridian, measured on the equator. Longitude in the Heavens, is distance east from the first point of Aries, measured on the ecliptic.
Page 195 - ... however, in this respect. In some, the condensation is slight and gradual ; in others great and sudden : so sudden, indeed, that they present the appearance of a dull and blotted star, or of a star with a slight burr round it, in which case they are called stellar...
Page 154 - ... transmitted through the nucleus, which they supposed to be transparent, and to operate as a lens. Kepler thought they were occasioned by the atmosphere of the comet, driven off by the impulse of the Sun's rays. This opinion, with gome modification, waa also maintained by Euler.
Page 268 - The moon is on the opposite side of the earth from the sun, and from Earth we see the complete sunlit half of the moon.
Page 336 - Indiction is 15. Solar Cycle: A period of 28 years, at the end of which the days of the month return to the same days of the week.
Page 234 - ... a line, drawn from the centre of the earth to the centre of the sun.
Page 238 - Obliquity of the ecliptic (obliguui, slanting) ; the inclination of the plane of the ecliptic to the plane of the Equator.
Page 167 - Trigonometry is the science which teaches how to determine the several parts of a triangle from having certain parts given.
Page 341 - ... or periphery. A portion of the circular line is called an arc, eg abc (fig. 39). The size of an arc with reference to the whole circumference is measured by degrees. Every circle is divided into 360 equal parts, which are called degrees ; each degree contains 60 minutes, and each minute 60 seconds.
Page 80 - The weight, of a body is the measure of the earth's attraction.

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