Metamorphoses

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Penguin, Aug 3, 2004 - Poetry - 768 pages
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Ovid’s sensuous and witty poem brings together a dazzling array of mythological tales, ingeniously linked by the idea of transformation—often as a result of love or lust—where men and women find themselves magically changed into new and sometimes extraordinary beings. Beginning with the creation of the world and ending with the deification of Augustus, Ovid interweaves many of the best-known myths and legends of ancient Greece and Rome, including Daedalus and Icarus, Pyramus and Thisbe, Pygmalion, Perseus and Andromeda, and the fall of Troy. Erudite but light-hearted, dramatic and yet playful, the Metamorphoses has influenced writers and artists throughout the centuries from Shakespeare and Titian to Picasso and Ted Hughes.

Includes introduction, a preface to each book, explanatory notes, and an index of people, gods, and places

 

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The Metamorphoses of Ovid

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Along with Virgil's Aeneid and Horace's Odes and Satires , Ovid's Metamorphoses is a central masterpiece of Augustan Latin poetry. A sort of fantastic epic, it traces the transformation of the world ... Read full review

Contents

Early Career
Ovid and Augustus
Structure and Scope
Literary Heritage
Themes
Impact
Notes
PROLOGUE
ORPHEUS AND EURYDICE
CYPARISSUS
INTRODUCTION
HYACINTHUS
THE CERASTAE AND PROPOETIDES
PYGMALION
MYRRHA
VENUS AND ADONIS 1

THE FOUR AGES
THE GIANTS
THE FLOOD
DEUCALION AND PYRRHA
PYTHON
DAPHNE
10 1
PAN AND SYRINX
PHA╦THON 1
PHA╦THON 2
CALLISTO
THE RAVEN AND THE CROW
OCYRHOE
BATTUS
AGLAUROS
EUROPA
CADMUS
ACTAEON
SEMELE
TEIRESIAS
NARCISSUS AND ECHO
PENTHEUS AND BACCHUS 1
ACOETES AND THE LYDIAN SAILORS
PENTHEUS AND BACCHUS 2
THE DAUGHTERS OF MINYAS 1
PYRAMUS AND THISBE
MARS AND VENUS
LEUCOTHO╦ AND CLYTI╦
SALMACIS AND HERMAPHRODITUS
THE DAUGHTERS OF MINYAS 2
INO AND ATHAMAS
CADMUS AND HARMONIA
PERSEUS 1
PERSEUS 2
MINERVA AND THE MUSES
THE RAPE OF PROSERPINA
ARETHUSA
TRIPTOLEMUS AND LYNCUS
THE DAUGHTERS OF PIERUS
ARACHNE
NIOBE
THE LYCIAN PEASANTS
MARSYAS
TEREUS PROCNE AND PHILOMELA
BOREAS AND ORITHYIA
MEDEA AND JASON
THE REJUVENATION OF AESON
THE PUNISHMENT OF PELIAS
MEDEAS FLIGHT
THESEUS AND AEGEUS
MINOS AND AEACUS
THE PLAGUE AT AEGINA
THE BIRTH OF THE MYRMIDONS
CEPHALUS AND PROCRIS
SCYLLA AND MINOS
THE MINOTAUR AND ARIADNE
DAEDALUS AND PERDIX
ACHELO▄S THE NAIADS AND PERIMELE
PHILEMON AND BAUCIS
ERYSICHTHON
ACHELO▄S AND HERCULES
HERCULES AND NESSUS
THE DEATH OF HERCULES
ALCMENA AND GALANTHIS
DRYOPE
IOLA▄S AND CALLIRHO╦S SONS
MILETUS
BYBLIS
IPHIS
ATALANTA AND HIPPOMENES
VENUS AND ADONIS 2
THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS
THE PUNISHMENT OF THE MAENADS
MIDAS
LAOMEDONS TREACHERY
PELEUS AND THETIS
PELEUS AT THE COURT OF CEYX 1
DAEDALION
PELEUS AT THE COURT OF CEX 2
CEX AND ALCYONE
AESACUS
THE GREEKS AT AULIS
RUMOUR
CYCNUS
ACHILLES VICTORY CELEBRATION
CAENIS
THE BATTLE OF THE LAPITHS AND CENTAURS
PERICLYMENUS
THE DEATH OF ACHILLES
THE JUDGMENT OF ARMS
AJAXS SUICIDE
THE FALL OF TROY
THE SUFFERINGS OF HECUBA
MEMNON
THE WANDERINGS OF AENEAS 1
THE DAUGHTERS OF ANIUS
THE DAUGHTERS OF ORION
THE WANDERINGS OF AENEAS 2
ACIS GALATEA AND POLYPHEMUS
GLAUCUS AND SCYLLA 1
GLAUCUS AND SCYLLA 2
THE WANDERINGS OF AENEAS 3
THE SIBYL OF CUMAE
ULYSSES MEN IN POLYPHEMUS CAVE
ULYSSES AND CIRCE
PICUS CANENS AND CIRCE
THE WANDERINGS OF AENEAS 4
THE APULIAN SHEPHERD
THE SHIPS OF AENEAS
ARDEA
AENEAS DESCENDANTS
POMONA AND VERTUMNUS
IPHIS AND ANAXARETE
ROMULUS
THE APOTHEOSIS OF ROMULUS
MYSCELUS
PYTHAGORAS
EGERIA AND HIPPOLYTUS
TAGES ROMULUS SPEAR CIPUS
AESCULAPIUS
THE APOTHEOSIS OF JULIUS CAESAR
BOOK 1
BOOK 2
BOOK 3
BOOK 4
BOOK 5
BOOK 6
BOOK 7
BOOK 8
BOOK 9
BOOK 10
BOOK 11
BOOK 12
BOOK 13
BOOK 14
BOOK 15
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About the author (2004)

Ovid—Publius Ovidius Naso—(43 bce–ce 17 or 18) was born into a wealthy Roman family and became the most distinguished poet of his time. He died in exile on the Black Sea, far from Rome and his literary life.


David Raeburn is a lecturer in classics at Oxford University. He has translated Sophocles and directed numerous school and university productions of Greek tragedies.

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